Salmon Inspiration!

I have a beautiful piece of salmon for dinner tonight. Tell me about your favorite preparations. I’ve been doing two on heavy rotation here but looking to change it up.

  1. I pulled this from the Milk Street magazine and only follow the idea now. Take your salmon and liberally apply kosher salt (original recipe calls for an herb mixed in with the salt, probably dill). Let the salted fish rest in the fridge 45-60 min. Rinse off, pat dry. Bake around 325 until internal temp gets to where you like it. 115-120 or so for us. Apply more herbs. So easy and delicious.

  2. Combine a coarse, seedy mustard and brown sugar into a paste, sometimes a splash of vinegar if I remember. Cover the fish with the paste, bake at a 400-450, brown the top a little for some caramelization. My kid loves this one.

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This Ina Garten panko-crusted salmon is my aunt’s go-to and I love it every time she makes it.

My lazier go-to is lemon juice, soy sauce and a few pats of butter and a very low oven temp (280 or 290F convection).

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I tend to go as simple as possible with wild-caught salmon (when I used to buy wild-caught sockeye salmon from Seabear) and cook it low and slow JUST until it flakes, seasoning only with their coarse salt/pepper blend. Their instructions: "Pre-heat oven to 275°F. Place salmon fillet skin side down on a cookie sheet brushed with olive oil, and bake for approximately 20 minutes. Do not flip salmon fillet. "

But I always like a light glaze of maple syrup and whole grain or coarse mustard brushed over it as well. OR a glaze of sweet/spicy - maple syrup and Sriracha to taste.

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Same! Sometimes I’ll take it even lower at 250, brush with mustard and do a panko crust.

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Olive oil poached salmon. You’ll need a lot of olive oil, but the silky texture of the cooked fish worth the trouble.

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If you have a sous vide circulator, you can recreate this effect with much less oil, too. I agree that the texture is totally worth the effort!

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I like to use almost the same recipe I use for seared chilean sea bass
It was posted on the 12/2018 what’s for dinner #40.
Bobby Flay’s recipe is almost similar. but I do not think he is using real (Aji Mirin) which makes a big difference as Aji mirin though sweet has no artificial sweetener His recipe calls for a1/4 cup of mirin. I like to use 4 years old aged mirin, the ones manufactured by ogasawara, When aji mirin is used, I use 1-2 tablespoon, just enough to offset the saltiness of the miso and give the fish a nice glaze. This aji mirin is not available in the US( as it contains 14% alcohol unless you can find it in a liquor store or buy sake and make your own aji mirin ) but can be purchased from The Japan Store, Well worth the effort. it is smooth so I was told and can be used as a liquor over rocks. It cost just about $10.00 plus fed Ex from Japan .I buy two bottles at a time, cost around $50 total with S/H . Japan Store has fantastic CS and keeps track , even sending an email when it arrives.

Basically, I sear the fish with EVOO, set aside, using the same frying pan ( obviously with chilean sea bass, no oil is used as it release a lot of oil during searing just like a duck breast), I add to the pan that has EVOO, ginger, garlic, miso, shoaxing wine , a tablespoon or two of mirin to offset the salty miso and some broth till it is reduced., add some spring onions, and sesame oil ,t hen I pour the sauce over the salmon to serve with rice. The sauce reduces very fast because of the miso. ideally, it should be thick enough to glaze the salmon. I like to add my rice to the pot to make use of every bit of that yummy sauce

Mirin is similar to sake , but has more sugar and a lower alcohol content ,14% to be precise .

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I wasn’t familiar with the chef, Nigel Palmer, and this site is a little too commercial-y, but I’ve used this recipe for firm white-flesh fish and salmon. It’s really good and easy. https://www.homechef.com/meals/korean-sesame-and-chile-roasted-mahi-mahi

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I’ve never done this but looks so wildly easy! Can’t wait to try it!

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Don’t know if you saw my mustard salmon “series” lol - here is the method and here are a couple of different versions of it - baked, cooked stovetop, and en papillote.

I love Nobu’s saikyo miso cod, which takes at least a day of prep, but ATK came out with a quicker version (texture is not as luscious as the longer marinade, but it’s still good).

And Vietnamese caramel fish is a lovely application too.

Adding one more - Parsi patra-ni-macchi ie fish wrapped in a banana leaf (OG en papillote) - fish is coated in green chutney with optional coconut, wrapped up, and steamed. You can also bake it with the chutney as a sauce, but the packet version is a bit different.

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I do the Pacific Northwest Salmon from New Basics every. Single. Week.


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I missed your mustard series entirely! Thanks for posting! Love the idea of that miso salmon too.

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Baste with Kewpie brand creamy roasted sesame dressing before baking at 375-400F. That dressing should be a controlled substance!

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With or without MSG? :rage:

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Open wide… https://www.kewpieshop.com/products/kewpie-deep-roasted-sesame-dressing-8oz

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold