What's your Home kitchen knife batterie?

A chair is the defining, stand out element of your kitchen? Why?

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See above, Meekah, or my Joy thread.




You know, it’s only the humidity that keeps me from going outside the house and banging my head against my brick walls.

I can’t believe this never came to mind. Not thinking outside the box, I guess. Or rather, not thinking “outside the meat-ball”.

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Mine is called a Accurit. I just tried putting a refrigerator magnet behind it an a small, not sharp knife in front and the knife didn’t hang around. I must need better magnets.

That’s ok, Ray. I’ll stick with extrapolating Nielsen and general usability parameters.

My sister uses several of those “Accurit” brand rulers in her artwork.

I used 6 neodymium disk magnets (about the size of a penny but a bit thicker) sandwiching the window pane’s glass. Then placed the ruler on the front pane. Held too well, really - it was hard to pull the knives off and I found I had to twist/rotate toward the spine side to get them to loosen.

I’ve also got some weaker (thinner) neodyms that I was going to test but never got around to it. I buy online from K&J Magnetics; the thicker guys tested for the knife holder are about 50 cents and I think the weaker are more like 35 cents each. I have to buy 20 or so every few years because I’m not careful enough to keep them from smashing together and they fracture easily. But they’re good for holding stuff to the fridge and for copying “experiments” the kids and I would find on youtube.

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Thank you!

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In my last job I administered, among other things, the state’s affordable housing programs. Units needed to be made fully accessible if a tenant requested. It is a pretty quick and easy conversion if the floor plan provided for adequate turn radii.

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And accessibility standards, in physical spaces and in technology, aren’t based on subjective observations ( I’ve taught this stuff to the folks who are tasked with compliance). It’s a competitive advantage if you do it from the beginning!

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Hi Vecchiouomo,

I live in a small house, not an apartment, and have planned and carried out this kitchen project as an experiment from the beginning. This is already a remodel from the first design, with more built-ins and electrical circuits.

The kitchen is a galley kitchen that could be replicated and/or reinstalled somewhere else. It’s such a great joy to use that I sometimes do sit there and meditate–looking at the rose bushes.

I think these comments are quite far removed from my initial “how many kitchen knives?” question.

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Which you participated in, so why are you complaining?

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Hi Vecchiouomo,

The determining qualifier for handicapped of all ages is the Instrumental Activity of daily living:

If one reaches the state where IADL performance is difficult, it usually precludes the type of kitchen I’ve developed–which is one reason why I can’t get a funded study. We’d probably find that my octopus kitchen won’t help enough.

FYI the term “handicapped” is disfavored, indicating begging with cap in hand. Preferred “person first” terminology would be a person with a disability.

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Accessibility is extensively governed by federal regulation.

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Hi Vecchiouomo,

I’ve worked on–even wrote–funded NIA projects. I also reviewed the development of the IADL measure. I think that my Octopus kitchen could work in private, well funded, senior home/condo kitchens, but it’s never been something I wanted to do.

Did you read what Tim wrote? Here, I’ll help you:

The conversation was about Accessibility, which is far broader in scope than IADL or NIA. The ADA applies to anyone, regardless of age. Tim has actual administrative experience , which isn’t “projects” or “review”.

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And there is little room for tinkering without violating the ADA. Lord knows, it was exhausting bird dogging developers trying to offer alternatives. An ADA compliant unit in an ADA compliant development ought to be the norm. The regs allow for aspects to be readily convertible. This ought to apply to SFDs, too. Why should a person buying or renting a home have to lower light switches, add visual smoke alarms, or have to get assistance to get from a parking space to your front door? Oooo, a bandwagon for me to jump on!

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Jump! My condo is 30 years old, but conversion would not be too difficult. I’ve noticed that newer condos have a lot more accessibility in place from the get go. My kitchen has ample turn around room, and while not an open kitchen (thank God, but that’s another story) is completely barrier free to enter - with direct access from the foyer. It’s always cheaper to do it right from the beginning than to clean up your mistakes afterwards. That way, everyone wins. I stayed in a brand new Marriott the year before the pandemic, and I at first thought I’d been given a disability room. I even took pictures to show people. But no! The rooms were all accessible! I’m sure their new extended stay facilities had accessible kitchens, too. The regs are there, waiting to be put into concrete (pardon the pun) action.

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That helps explain your space constraints. I have the luxury of lots of space, and the times where I’ve been constrained to a small galley style kitchen (like on vacation) I’ve made do, but not liked it. But if you started out with that space constraint and made the best of it and made it work well for your cooking, then more power to you.

But in the photo you’ve posted, on the far right it looks like you’ve got a small electric oven (below the counter) plugged into a regular extension cord. I’m worried the oven draws more than can be long-term supported by that extension cord and may be a fire hazard, especially if that circuit breaker is relatively high amp (then the breaker won’t break at amperage rates that are capable of burning that extension cord).

Note that Home Depot or Lowes etc. sell cords for window AC units that are rated at a lot higher amps. I’m thinking you should use one of those higher amp extension cords instead. Just thinking out loud.

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Ray’s been told about that extension cord!!

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