THAI - Summer 2019 (Jul-Sept) Cuisine of the Quarter

cuisine-of-the-quarter
#1

The votes are in and we decided to spice things up this summer with THAI! I am very excited - I have had a copy of David Thompson’s Thai Food for ages and I keep meaning to delve into it, but somehow haven’t been able to concentrate on it. I look forward to learning and experimenting with you all in the coming months!

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What's for Dinner #47 - the Halfway Through The Year Edition - July 2019
#2

Exactly the same situation as you!!

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#3

Let’s cook through it together! :grin:

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pinned #4
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#5

We love Thai, and I especially love the salads with lots of herbs. I want to try some larb that I can eat with a veg wrapper, room temp or cold.

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(saregama) #6

Larb is on my list too - love it! Had an amazing whole fish dish recently that was dressed like larb.

And perhaps papaya salad.

I’m trying to stay away from noodles for a while, but pad see euw / pad key mao eventually.

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(saregama) #7

Thanks to @biondanonima’s reminder on the WFD thread, I skewed Thai for dinner tonight

SHRIMP PAD GARLIC PEPPER and SAUTÉED CABBAGE WITH LARB DRESSING

This is one of my favorite dishes at my favorite hole-in-the-wall Thai place. It’s ridiculously simple - the shrimp are sautéed and topped with golden-crisp garlic, over a bed of lettuce.

I didn’t have lettuce, but it turned out I had some cabbage languishing… not really, cabbage is remarkably sturdy. I originally intended a slaw with larb-ish dressing, but ended up sautéing the cabbage instead, with similar flavoring. Maybe raw tomorrow - I have more cabbage and more shrimp, and this meal bears repeating!

Missed cilantro bec my bunch finally went bad… sigh. Store run tomorrow.
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What's for Dinner #47 - the Halfway Through The Year Edition - July 2019
#8

Sure after the travel end of this month.

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(saregama) #9

I had not heard of David Thompson until a couple of years ago. Andy Ricker might be a similar category?

I’m often hesitant about Indian recipes by non-Indian chefs/writers, but for Thai food these folks seem quite prolific and focused on authenticity.

The other books I’ve come across (but not cooked from) are Leela Punyaratabandhu‘s, and also Night+Market from the eponymous restaurant.

Any recommendations?
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#10

I love Thai - here is my “go to” website if people are looking for recipes too. I’ll have to link to some of the ones I have tried and enjoyed . . . .

http://shesimmers.com/

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(saregama) #11

Yes! That’s Leela Punyaratabandhu.

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#12

I just got back from vacation and haven’t had time to delve into actual cooking, but I did order a very tasty Thai lunch yesterday so I thought I’d share. Midtown Manhattan is home to a plethora of mediocre Thai restaurants all serving the same sweet, insipid curries, but I have found one or two that serve them properly spicy. My current favorite is a place called Viv, but while their curry is good, I mainly order from there to get Chiang Mai sausage, also known as Sai Ua. It’s not a super common menu item in NYC despite being (so I hear) an incredibly popular snack in Thailand. Viv’s version is slightly sweet and slightly spicy, and full of ginger and garlic flavors. They also use very finely-ground meat and not a lot of filler (at least as far as I can tell).

The one other place I have found in my neighborhood that serves a sausage (their menu just calls it House Sausage, so not sure of the variety) uses a much coarser grind of meat and quite a bit of rice (left in whole kernels), with less seasoning so the overall flavor is very porky and savory. I am guessing it is their interpretation of either Naem or Sai Krok Isan. It is also delicious.

Anyway, I am sure it’s not at all the way Thais eat either of these sausages, but I love to add them to green curry for an extra portion of protein and a hit of porky flavor. I need to seek out some recipes so I can make these at home.

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