All the things you do with beets

Go! I’m in a beet rut. But with a beet glut.

Hummus
Pickled
Soup
Roasted
Add to salads
To dye Eater eggs
To dye tshirts :love_you_gesture:
Add to cream cheese for sandwich spread

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One the the vegs I always have on hand. Love beetroots since I was a child.

The possibilities are near endless. I’ve even made bread, Sauerkraut and kimchi. Many uses in German and Austrian cuisines. I was visiting a friend in Switzerland where I ate a kind of beetroot relish made by his Ukrainian wife.

I’m going to make a “curry” but have to wait until all the yellow and pink beetroots to be finished first, then I’ll get the red kind for the “curry”.

Borscht.
Gefilte fish with beets and horseradish.

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What do you currently do with beets?

If you have a glut of beets, I highly recommend pickling them. It is super easy, they will last all winter, and taste great on a cheese/charcuterie plate. I started doing that when our CSA kept giving us beets and I just couldn’t eat them anymore. Since we treat our charcuterie as finger food - I especially like doing it with golden beets but surprisingly the red beets don’t stain the same way once they are pickled . . . (but I still find them risky as finger food).

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Roast and chunk. Or chunk and roast. Serve as a side or part of a salad. Shred and borscht. I once tried shred and make a big ole cake of it in a fry pan (forget the name) but there were no additives. Just seasoning.

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Presunto, I was hoping you’d reply, because I was prompted by your beet dumplings on “Lunch.” Can you share your recipe/method? And please share about the bread.

My grandpa made the most delicious gefilte fish when I was a kid. It was roasted rather than boiled, or whatever the heck that grey sweet jarred stuff is that passes for gefilte in the grocery store. And they did in fact serve it with a grated beet/horseradish mixture for dipping. So sadly, I was too young to have absorbed the recipe, and he has passed. I do recall it was very labor intensive. But also, this doesn’t really use up a lot of beets. I’m all over the borscht.

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I like it. May have to wait a little until we free up some jars. This year, between our jams, pickled cukes, pickled green beans, zuke relish, pesto, and preserved tomatoes, I literally have no jars left. Started with about 70, so that is somewhat frightening.

What’s your pickle recipe? And do you pickle them raw, or cook them first?

Chocolate cake! or Chocolate cake!
or BROWNIES!

We had sliced beets and horseradish alongside of gifilte fish.
Roast, puree and add to pasta dough. Beet pasta.
I also like them sliced with cottage cheese.

I have made them many times and no longer measure anything. Once you know the basic recipe you can improvise (I always do, like adding chickpeas to dumplings).

This is a basic recipe for Tyrolean dumplings I used when I first started learning how to make them. I like them best with melted butter and crispy fried Speck (you can use smoked bacon). Oh, I don’t precook beetroots for bread and dumplings. Most recipes say to precook them, though.

I have to look for the bread recipe somewhere in my pdf files. There are quite a few recipes for beetroot bread out there. Better yet, they are in English. Mine is in German…

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Easter…eggs

Really? I’ve put winter squash into brownies, but I haven’t tried beets. Then again, I’m not trying to mask the flavor. I like the flavor. Just sort of uninspired by the way I’ve been preparing them…

I’ve been meaning to learn to make pasta, and the winter holidays may be just the time. Thanks!

Jewish. No Easter.

Posted today on the Lunch thread, beet/beef soup with horseradish cream

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We celebrate every holiday.

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@ Sasha
I’ve been meaning to learn to make pasta, and the winter holidays may be just the time. Thanks!

Beets certainly work in basic egg noodle dough. And I have incorporated pureed beets into gnocchi dough. Lovely! Also in spaetzle… Just make sure your puree is smooth.

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