Making "Elvis Presley's Favorite Pound Cake"-starts in cold oven.

Here is the recipe

I don’t bake much, but a few weeks ago we ate out, and a desert by a different name reminded husband of this. I’ve made this recipe of and on for years, and sometimes it comes out perfectly, and other times, not as well.

One thing I notice about it at it’s best is the caramelized crust.
At it’s worse, I notice the temperature of the kitchen can make or break the creaming process, and getting the texture of the batter evenly distributed in the pan.
From Cooks illustrated

They had a nice picture depicting how to know when a stick of butter is right, but I can’t seem to find it within the editing window of time.

ETA here it is!

What I don’t understand is the role of starting with a cold oven.

Anybody have any insights?

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If you start a cake in a cold oven, the crust won’t set as quickly as it would in a hot oven, so you should get more volume. I’ve also seen recipes for bread, bacon, salmon that call for a cold oven.

But it it’s a cake with a lot of beaten egg whites, then you probably want a hot oven.

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Thank you!!
I kept the kitchen at 73 F while preparing batter! Shhh! Don’t tell the hubs!.


Pulled away from the sides?

If you had to pick…under or over baked?

Cooled 17 , not 30 minutes , in pan

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Pulled away from sides is one sign of done-ness. Color looks good, so I would say ‘just right’ unless the interior crumb tells you otherwise.

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dessert…:unamused:

“I’ve made this recipe of and on” should be OFF and on.

Looks delicious. Will you enjoy it as is or do you plan to make a sauce, drizzle, compote?

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Husband will probably have it with milk (we go to dinner in Napa and he always wishes there was milk on the menu.) I don’t plan to indulge, but if I do, it will likely be accompanied by the light of the moon.

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Well, it looks like you’ve got it down. That’s a damn pretty undercarriage. Bookmarking!

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Some cold-oven pound cake explanation.

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold