Korean rice sticks/cakes

I know I’m cooking them wrong. These are the extruded rice flour sticks of varying widths. I love them but I’m never sure how to reheat them once they’ve been refrigerated. Also, what are they sauced with, generally speaking?

Varying width, do you mind showing a photo?

Usual way is to soak them for several hours, and bring a pot to a boil and cook the cakes for 8 - 10 minutes. Dry the cakes with paper towels and use them immediately, stir fry or in a soup.

I’ve made this new year soup before from Korean Town book. I don’t know if it’s the same rice cakes as yours.

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The Korean eat Tteokbokki, rice sticks as snacks with a sweet spicy sauce. We had this in the Tongin market in Seoul last year, the only fried version. Excellent!

The photos reminded me that I haven’t post my Korean trip yet. I should do it soon!

Recipe here:

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I love rice cakes! I grew up eating the flat oval shaped ones (common in some regional Chinese cuisine), and discovered the round log-shaped ones with Korean cuisine. Those photos look sooo good. :star_struck:

What I like to do to prepare rice cakes is to soak them in water for a few hours. Softening them before hand I think makes them much easier to stir-fry, plus it removes some extra starch in the soaking process. I would just drain well and make sure they are not too wet (or dripping wet) when you transfer them to your pan or wok. I find this gives them a better sear or char, if that’s what you’re looking for.

For refrigerated rice cakes, I usually will drop them in boiling water to soften and again drain well before adding to a skillet.

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Yep, that’s them, all right. About the size of the ones you got in the Tongin market. They make them at the Korean market up the street, and they’re soft when I get them. I think they’d dissolve if I soaked and boiled them, they’re very fresh. Thanks for all the good preparation info!

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Thanks- I’ll try that.

Don’t they get really, really gluey and start to fall apart after being in water for a few hours? The ingredients on the ones I buy fresh say “rice flour, water, salt”.

Surprisingly no. But use cold water of course, not hot water. I’ve soaked overnight and they definitely become more pliable but don’t fall apart. This is even true if you used the flat oval shaped ones.

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That’s really interesting- I’m going to go try it.

In Korea the rice sticks are simmered all day. The starches are released but you don’t really eat that.


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Oh, I love and miss Korea! I was supposed to return this christmas!

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold