Decision made: I'm taking a latke shortcut!


(Cindy) #1

I’ll be having my family (and extended family) over for a Hanukkah brunch. No matter how many latkes I make, there are never enough, and I usually end up frying batch after batch after batch. It’s labor intensive and time consuming, so this year I’m taking a shortcut. I sent my daughter on a latke-tasting mission in NYC, but decided against “importing” them when I saw that they cost between $2.50 and $3.00 EACH. Then, after reading some fairly good reviews of Trader Joe’s latkes, I decided to give them a try and guess what… they’re VERY good!!! I bought a box of 8, baked half in the oven and fried the rest in canola oil. The oven baked – not so great. But the fried are almost as good as my from-scratch latkes. Much better than I ever thought possible from a box. So yes, I’ll still be frying them, but that’s easy. Problem solved!!!


#2

Shame, shame! Kidding, what ever gets you through the night. Sounds like you are still going to fry

Frying is the hardest part to me. I use a food pro to grate unless I’m doing a small amount, add powdered vitamin C to keep them from turing brown so the mix holds up well. That takes little time compared to standing at the stove frying batch after batch after batch. If I was doing a lot I might consider frying the day before and crisping and reheating them up and in the oven just before serving and when you’re out you’re out!


#3

Why is this the first I am hearing of this??? Vitamin C powder…regular from the drugstore???


#4

Regular low cost ones from the drug or grocery store. Doesn’t take much. Maybe one 500mg to treat a lot of ground potatoes. Can’t taste it. I just crush them in a mortar and pestle to a fine powder


#5

Thanks! I see a lot of hash browns in my future :wink:


#6

I think it has to be ascorbic acid specifically? Someone correct me if I’m wrong.


(Gwenn) #7

I could live on them!!!


(Cindy) #8

When making them from scratch I use the FP too. And I find that if I alternate the onions with the potatoes when I grate them, they don’t turn dark. But then there’s the task of squeeeeeeezing the liquid out, and that’s quite time consuming. That, and the fact that the kitchen is a mess when I’m finally finished. So frying the pre-made latkes will be relatively quick, easy and not messy.


#9

Same thing in most cases. I’ve never seen vitamin C sold as anything but


#10

Not great for doing large quantities at one time but I’ve been using a potato ricer to remove a lot of water from the grated potatoes. Squeeze the crap out of them. They get really dry and I can decant and scoop out the starch to add back in


#11

Vitamin C is ascorbic acid.


#12

Ascorbic acid is vitamin C, but is only one of many forms of it sold as supplements.


#13

The vitamin c trick works great to keep super fresh green soups that amazing color too (spring pea soup, asparagus soup, prevents broccoli soup crom going grey/green…)


#14

Now, if I can just manage to remember this the next time I’m making soup or hash browns :slight_smile:


(Cindy) #15

I’ve been using this method… put the grated potatoes and onions into a cheesecloth-lined bowl. Gather the ends of the cheesecloth, wrap them around the handle of a wooden spoon and twist.


#16

.[quote=“CindyJ, post:15, topic:2407, full:true”]

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I’ve been using this method… put the grated potatoes and onions into a cheesecloth-lined bowl. Gather the ends of the cheesecloth, wrap them around the handle of a wooden spoon and twist.

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I do that with a thin cotton kitchen towel that is now nicely stained :wink: The towels also work well for keeping washed lettuce fresh


#17

Yeh that’s how I have done it. The ricer gets even more water out if you squeeze like it owes you money :money_mouth_face:


(erica) #18

You can also find it as Citric Acid Powder, through pet supply outlets among other places.
When I showed Siamese and Orientals, I used it in the special diet I mixed up for them to supplement the canned cat food of that era. I also used it when baking desserts with apples, pears, and peaches

As I recall, I found that the TJ latkes had decent flavor but were too thick/dense for me.


(Cindy) #19

If I were making them from scratch, I’d make them thinner than TJ’s, but TJ’s do crisp up nicely, especially around the edges.


(Duffy) #20

CindyJ,

Use a salad spinner to get most of the liquid out, then squeeze what’s left. Much less work.

Duffy