Automatic Pasta Maker "Gun"

Anyone come across or used one of these?

Reminds me of this manual Indian chakri & sev press which extrudes a dough out to noodles and other shapes:

Or one of these spritz cookie presses (but I don’t think they’re strong enough for a firmer dough, since the spritz cookie mixture is pretty soft):

My issue with extruders (and I have had one for three decades) is that you have to make “different” pasta dough. Drier, ideally more semolina, and the texture just isn’t as good as what you can make by hand.

So if you need to make something only an extruder will do (i.e. you can’t cut/shape it by hand), my feeling is that you’re just as good buying dried. Not saying you can’t make it a bit better, but I much prefer hand made and haven’t used my extruder in years.

I’ve used the Indian hand press I linked and the dough is what you’d normally make.

That’s why I’m curious about the automatic one - could use the same dough but with an easier / quicker extrusion.

If I put my regular pasta dough in my electric extruder it does not feed properly or jams.

Yes, I recall an earlier thread. Pasta machines usually use a different hydration proportion as we discussed then - did you ever experiment?

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Nope. I really like what I can do with pasta via sheets from the roller (different flavors, colors, etc.) and have not been motivated to reengineer it for the “way too finicky” extruder. Love fettuccine, ravioli, lasagna, tagliatelle, tortellini, and so many more shapes I can cut/shape by hand.

Spaghetti, linguine, and other extruded stuff like macaroni I don’t do much, and just buy dry if I really need/or am too lazy to make (which is why the extruder is pretty much just gatering dust).

Tbh when I’ve had fresh spaghetti I didn’t love the texture… but fresh pappardelle or tagliatelle? Now that’s a game-changer!

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Sunday market in Ubud, Indonesia
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