Who wants to talk about Asian dumplings?

With regard to using the “Korean Rice Paper”, it will take practice, and steaming, or maybe room temp will help, but I might have to reserve eating this at restaurants. Nothing was quite right. I did like the texture of the noodle, but probably easier to grab some BBQ with, than wrapping a rice noodle roll.





Sigh. I probably shouldn’t be making a habit of this anyway. :worried:

2 Likes

OH NO?! Was there a best before date?

Not that I can see, but I don’t think that was the problem. I hesitated to open the package, because I knew there would be a lot left, I wasn’t sure how I would store it, and I wanted time to experiment. I had only the round steamer in the picture, so I couldn’t do squares, but where I was able to steam it, and roll it in the pan just right, I was pleased. The thing I liked the least was the seasoning on the pork reccommended in the first link. Probably too many ingredients, and I couldn’t tell what I didn’t like. I might try again.

Maybe you could use / repurpose them as chow fun / ho fun?

2 Likes

From their website, they do not talk about the preparation, how to cook the Korean rice paper etc, but they have instructions for other wrappers or noodles.
http://leesnoodle.com/Product

I suspect for what you want to do, you should use Thin Rice Paper 超薄粉皮 Bánh Ướt Mỏng or better, the home made ones suggested by the others. :yum:

Screen Shot 2020-10-11 at 13.02.16

1 Like

I like rice paper and I’m going to try this rice paper too, but I wonder if it’s what I have in mind. This one seems like the right thickness. I worked with the “Korean Rice Paper” again today, and I’m getting the hang of it, but there was a lot of waste.


2 Likes
“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold