What's for Dinner #59 - the Summertime Covid Blues Edition - July 2020

Chicken tacos (not pictured) Had to run to the Mexican market to get some decent corn tortillas, and multicolored fingerling potatoes and carrots, which were roasted in the counter oven. A nice IPA to go along with dinner

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Hummus topped with spiced ground beef, onion, and cherry tomatoes. And bread.

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One of my favorites! What was on the beef?

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One of my favorites as well

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Probably base on hummus bil lahme. When someone tells me they don’t like chickpeas I make a crucifix with my index fingers :-1:

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The incentive to cook is low these days, only simple stuff, nothing to write about. Made this Jamie Oliver recipe numerous times: chicken in milk with lemon zest, sauge, cinnamon and unpeeled garlic. I replaced the ingredients by something more SE Asian. Chicken in coconut milk with makrut zest, cinnamon, star anise, lemongrass and unpeeled garlic. Cooked in oven for about an hour. Used tons of hairy apple mint as garnish. It worked well with roasted celery root.

A veal tartare with roe and caper, sided with cucumber and mint.

Classic - tomato mozzarella

Not a good idea to eat marrow in summer, felt very heavy after the meal.

I got this inspiration from the restaurant meal of klyeoh’s delicious Malaysian meal and made the duck breast with red curry and the Mee Bandung in tomato with dried shrimp broth, both a delight.

His meal is here:

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Oh dear. We’re all entitled to a ‘meh’ meal once in a while, but…do you need us to ship stuff to you?

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WOWSA, that’s some impressive cooking! I’m not familiar with “hairy apple mint” but I’m hitting Google to learn more!

And a question, if you (or anyone else) is familiar with Malaysian cooking; an Asian fusion restaurant (actually v good) has a soup called Asam that is listed as Malaysian and I absolutely LOVE it. I’ve never been able to find a recipe that really seems to match what they make, so I’ve wondered if Asam is equivalent to saying ‘curry’–as in, everyone’s version is different? Their version is similar in looks to a Tom Kha Gai, but that’s not what it is–that’s my best point of comparison.

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Your duck looked amazing, and as good as any one would find in a good top-flight restaurant. :grin: :+1:

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“Asam” means tamarind in Malay. The souring agent used is either dried sliced tamarind or what the Malays call “asam keping” (you add a few slivers of these directly into the simmering stock when cooking), or tamarind paste which the Malays call “asam Gelugor” ( you add a few tablespoons of the tamarind paste to water, mix thoroughly then strain, and use just the liquid).

A good recipe here is “Asam Pedas” (we use the two spellings “asam” and “assam” interchangeably) using fish by Rasa Malaysia, which provides really authentic recipes which even we in Malaysia and Singapore refer to:

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Thank you! Just knowing that it means tamarind explains why I like the flavor, which I always describe as somehow spicy/sour/sweet. The photo with that recipe has far more in the bowl than the version I’ve had, which has a bunch of red onion, a few button mushroom halves, and just a couple of pieces of white meat chicken. While there’s a slick of red (oil?) spice on top, it’s a fairly boring looking bowl, but wow, does it pack a punch. Especially satisfying on a v cold day, but I’ll eat it any time I’m near the restaurant–and usually order one to go as well. :slight_smile:

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I’d surmise that the version you had would have been made gentler and milder, compared to the fiery versions we have here. Yes, the red oil is very likely the result of sauteing ground, fresh chili paste (fresh chilis blended with onions, ginger & perhaps a bit of fresh garlic) in oil.

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@CurlzNJ Thanks a lot for the compliments.

Glad that @klyeoh replied! I’m just playing with Malaysian cooking once a while and know nothing much about it. His well written food adventures in the Asian board has a lot of interesting facts about history, culture and food. I hope more HOers would read his posts.

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Thanks a lot, I have to start cooking more MY food inspired by your dishes, everybody at home was happy with the meal.

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@CurlzNJ

:rofl:

My comments there allowed me to avoid a rant regarding what I see as total mismanagement in our national foods distribution logistics.

Thank you for the kind offer, tho.

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Peppers, EVOO, basil


Cauliflower soup with oysters, curry oil

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Totally get it! I think we’ve all had trips like that in the last few months…

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Love those rainbow beets. My kinda meal, looks fab!

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Some asshole with mint :slight_smile:
Mint grows with underground runners. To keep it contained, it needs a pot, or you need to dig a trench around it at least 12" deep and put in a plastic barrier that it can’t get through. Similar to certain types of bamboo. But it sure is nice to have around, especially in the spring when it’s tender. The rest of the year, when it’s a bit tougher, I like to put it in pitchers of ice tea, lemonade, or water, and let it steep in the fridge.

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Like this dish. Does the soup have cream in it?

A while ago, I cooked some whole pepper in oven, H copies it and now does it often with barbecue and marinated with EVOO and herbs and becomes HIS speciality. :thinking: :rofl:

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold