What a wonderful story

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What do you think “four sandwiches with paste.” means? What is paste?

This will be either meat paste or fish paste, like a sandwich spread. I had them growing up it was always just meat or fish, nothing more specific. And it wasn’t wise to seek more information by looking more carefully at the ingredients. Disappointingly they now specify the species.

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What a strangely sad life.

But, I suppose, if you’ve never experienced anything different - by way of food, travel, relationships, life - then you probably don’t know what you’ve missed.

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“ My heart belongs here with the birds and the trees. I knew, if I left, I’d be thinking about my valley the whole time, so what would be the point? All I want is right here.

People might think I’m not experiencing new things, but I think the secret to a good life is to enjoy your work.

If someone offered me £2m to move, I would tell them to keep it. Most evenings I walk right up to the top of the valley. I look down and everything looks small and far away. And I feel like I’m on top of the world.”

Yes, isn’t it just sad how he has found his happiness while so many toil at finding theirs?

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I suppose it depends on how you see sadness and happiness. But I’m pleased to see you agree with me.

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Perhaps one person’s life would be sad if lived the way he has chosen. So that’s the most that can be said. He seems quite content. Good for him.

Most people have enough trouble running their own life and have no buisness running or judging others.

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A life not judging others wouldnt be much fun. :grinning:

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This reminds me of my fellow middle of the country
folks who seem quite content in a place I despaired over and eventually left to Go West, young man.
There’s no one formula for happiness, thankfully.
If anyone remembers the Mr. & Mrs. Bridge novels by Evan S. Connell they describe the stifling atmosphere of the area.
:cowboy_hat_face:

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Loved reading about a life so different from my own.

This article brings to mind a 1997 film called The Castle, in which a family in Australia are considered unsophisticated because they delight in the smallest of everyday things. I won’t spoil the plot, but we enjoyed this movie for its gentle humor and a life lesson about appreciating what’s in front of you.

One of my favorite bits of dialogue from the film comes from a scene at the family’s dinner table:

“Woo hoo. What do you call this?

”Chicken.”

”And it’s got something sprinkled on it.”

”Seasoning.”

”Seasoning! Looks like everybody’s kicked a goal.”

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Sometimes you do need fly the coop to find your birds of a feather. That proved true for my husband and me.

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Thank you for the link, @retrospek.

This man’s contentment with his life, a life lived on his terms and with so much connectivity to the world around him, is beautiful. I am glad for him.

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I have often thought about the things that contribute to some folks never going far from where they started, and others going what seems to be as far as they can. Sometimes away from something, sometimes to something, maybe sometimes a mix.

I was one of those who ended up relatively far away, as did my mom and dad, but only relatively.

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It sounds like a depressingly sad life actually. Lolololol.

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The content life and peaceful simplicity.

^^My partner is like the lady. Just that expression of utter contentment and bliss. No camera, no phone, only there to enjoy the moment. People we have met in our travels always say “Wow. Not sure if I can do it.” On the boat watching and touching whales. Polar bear safari. Wildlife safari. Antarctica, Spitzbergen, incredible rice terraces in Yuanyang, China. Everyone else, including me, and our many cameras and phones :smile: (though I’m not a phone user and don’t bring it especially when travelling)

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My partner is the same: present and experiencing the moment. I respect that in him and in others, though I do not always follow his lead.

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Shall see if I can find the Dvd at FNAC …

How do you think the onion is prepared?

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I don’t think it is sad at all. What would be sad is if he were forced to move away, or for another person to be forced to live this seemingly circumscribed life. But for the speaker, it seems right. Different strokes.

I imagine the onion is simply sliced.

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Heaven knows. It may be the most disparate list of foods I’ve ever come across declared as a meal. And every day??? Not even when I do a desperate raid on the freezer brown gloop drawer.

By the by, Americans are reminded that a Brit biscuit is a different beast from a Yank biscuit. I presume he has these as a a form of dessert.

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold