Turntable at Lord Stanley in San Francisco

At the end of February we went to celebrate my husband’s birthday at Turntable at Lord Stanley. Lord Stanley is a creative restaurant in SF. Last time we were there was several years ago for my birthday and we had a fantastic meal. Post-pandemic the restaurant has been reimagined as a restaurant where every month an up and coming chef collaborates with the Lord Stanley chefs for a tasting menu. For the month of February the collaborating chef was Eric Huang from Pecking Restaurant in NY. I am jaded and picky about high-end restaurant meals but our meal was excellent.


The dungeness crab lions head soup was elegant and flavorful and an excellent way to start the meal.

The Shrimp and chive dumpling was one the the best things I have eaten all year

The rest of the meal was excellent. The only dish that missed the mark for us was the almond custard which had a gummy texture and artificial flavor that molecular gastronomy desserts can sometimes have. The olive oil cake desert was excellent. We have reservations for March where the collaborating chef is Kevin Law.




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George - at a slight tangent, do you know anything of the history of the “Lord Stanley” name? Stanley is the family name of the Earls of Derby. The 17th Earl had a close connection with northwest England and was Secretary of State for War during WW1. I’m wondering if it’s the same family.

Very interesting. I am not sure if the family is related.

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The owners met in Oxfordshire and supposedly the restaurant is named after their favorite pub.

Regarding Turntable, I think the Pecking House menu was probably my least favorite of all of them so far, although that’s mostly a matter of personal taste. I did like the ma po menudo. (I liked the opening 3 months of Argentinian chefs most, especially Mecha from Cafe San Juan.) They’re still doing the take out fried chicken for this month, which is worth checking out if they have it available or you’re organized enough to make reservations for takeout. There’s a couple tables outside where you can eat it.

Thanks splonk

Just went for the immi SF popup that is hosted there right now and it is really superb.

We went back to Lord stanley this past weekend. The guest chef was Maxime Pradié. Form the website:

"Maxime’s experience in cutting-edge kitchens is balanced by his love of historical recipes and the time-intensive, but infinitely satisfying, style of cooking native to Southwestern France and Lombardy where his family hails from. "

The dinner was excellent.


Started with Oysters which were fresh and very satisfying and accentuated with the slightest hint of licorice from fresh fennel flowers.


Panisse with Crème Fraîche and Bottarga. The Panisse (chickpea fritter) was light and airy and the bottarga added a depth of flavor


Sardines stuffed with swiss chard, pine nuts and currants. This was good but maybe the weakest dish of the evening. The stuffing was slightly bland and under seasoned and the sardines themselves were very assertive tasting.


Celeriac and watercress soup with caviar. this was a supplement and we shared one. The briny caviar was the perfect seasoning for this satisfying soup.


Handmade pasta with chicken ragù and wild mushrooms. Excellent! The pasta itself was outstanding and toothsome. The overall dish was very homey and comforting.


Slow roasted lamb’s leg with anchovy, shelling beans, chicories. Maybe our favorite dish of the evening. The beans themselves were delicious. The greens were vibrant and very satisfying. The beans and the chicories were so good they would have been outstanding as stand alone dishes. The lamb was moist, smokey and perfectly cooked.


Puff pastry, frangipane, sunchoke caramel. I am not a fan of overly sweet desserts and this one was perfectly balanced. Flaky pastry with a delicious almond flavored moist filling. Excellent!

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I made the post so my text was interspersed with the pictures but it doesn’t seem to have worked.

I saw all eight pictures you included in the post.

On my iPhone, there’s a single picture object with arrows to scroll left or right through remaining photos.