Swedish mustard & dill sauce - what to do with it?

Last time I was at IKEA, I bought this jar of sauce - thinking I’m sure that’ll come in useful. Now I’m not so sure.

I think it must be the sauce that, traditionally, would go with gravadlax so presumably could use it with smoked salmon (gravadlax not being all that common in these parts) but are there any other suggestions for it?

A dinner is, so to speak, in your hands, my friends

salmon comma any kind.

it’d do well with baked or broiled; less so with poached or fried.

hopefully it’s good stuff to your taste(s). just because it’s Swedish does not mean you’re gonna’ like it… taste the sauce before you douse the fish.

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Depending on how pungent it is, and what else it contains, it might work as a dip for cocktail sausages or crudites, and as a baste/glaze for chicken or pork. I’d spread it on any fish before baking or broiling. I’d also try it as a sandwich spread with cold cuts.

Oooh i come home with the most wonderful random treats from the ikea food section! (Elderflower syrup last time)

I’m sure the Swedes use it on all sorts of fish but i would use it on little roasted potatoes, or in a shaved carrot salad (i love carrots with dill), or add to some neutral oil and white wine vinegar for salad dressing. Or stir a gob into some plain greek yogurt for a dip for crudite…

An excuse to make your own gravadlax, John. Half sides of salmon can be had for about £6 at Tesbury’s. I find Felicity Cloake’s Guardian “How to make the perfect…” articles very good for all sorts of standards:

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2015/jan/07/how-to-make-perfect-gravadlax-cured-salmon-recipe

For something different seek out a beetroot based recipe. I do this at Christmas, and the results look fantastic:

http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/beetroot-gravadlax

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Looks fab, Robin. Something to consider next time I’m in Sainsco.

I’m a big fan of Felicity’s column - particularly like the way she discusses how the various cooks/chefs approach a dish before coming up with a “best recipe”.

It’s so easy to make, do give it a go. I often make it in the summer. Looks stunning when grated beetroot is used. (I have posted it before on WFD on that wretched site)

warm potato salad?

That is one thing I bought at IKEA I’ve never developed a taste for, despite being one quarter Swedish and trying diligently these last few years to learn to appreciate the foods of my distant cousins. The sweetness of it was very off putting and I’ve never got used to it. Swedes seem to favor a sweet condiment with meat, as in Lingonberry jam with meatballs. In the US, at least, a cream gravy is always served with kottbullar. Even Senap Grov, IKEA’s Swedish coarse mustard, is slightly sweet, but I’ve gotten used to that.

The IKEA listing says it goes with salmon, crab, shrimp, marinated meats, ham and as a salad dressing. Maybe the idea of a warm potato salad would be good. I’d advise using it in modest amounts until you find what you like.

The best use of it I found was with a Swedish Christmas ham which is finished not with a sweet glaze like we do in the US but with a coating of egg, mustard and bread crumbs. I also like it, in a modest amount, with Prinskorv, the diminutive sausages, like mini-hot dogs, pork, which are fried in butter. I never tried it but I think it might similarly work with Falukorv, which is basically what we in the US call ring bologna.

I picked up the Ekologisk Marmelad Apelsin & Flader last time - organic orange and elder flower marmalade - I’ll be buying this again for sure. I like it better than the Lingon.

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Breadcrumb coating on ham is fairly common in the UK (although in this house it’s honey/mustard)

Me too. Havnt opened it yet as I’ve still got a jar of marmalade from the farmers market.

I use it as a sauce for grilled or pan seared salmon. My son likes it with smoked salmon on crackers.

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