Peppers I.D. please?

(erica) #1

My guess is that the peppers in my Mischief Box (center of pic) are shishito, which I have never used. I am pretty wimpy with chilis. Jalapeno heat is my comfort limit. Are these hotter? If so, I’ll rehome them.

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#2

They look like shashito peppers to me.

Good news/ bad news.

Good news - they are more mild than jalapeños and are very tasty.

Bad news - they are known for occassionally being more hot that jalapeños. It’s a random thing and generally people say 1 in 10 is hot. So if you have a bowl of roasted peppers - people will be eating them and all of a sudden one person gets a hot one.

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#3

In my experience, shusito’s are rarely hot; the spanish padron peppers are more likely to erupt, especially late in the growing season and when they are rather large.

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(Denise) #4

I’m with @Thimes on this one. There’s no certainty that those shishito peppers won’t have bite.

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#5

I love shishitos, especially sauteed in a little olive oil and salt until blistered. Occasionally one can be hot, but to me it’s not killer hot, and I’m fairly wimpy. I guess I put up with it because the non-hot ones are so good. Padrons, on the other hand, can really get you. And that basket looks wonderful!

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#6

I’m also a wimp too but I like them grilled with a squeeze of like and salt. Yum!

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(erica) #7

Thanks, all. I warily sliced one into a side salad made from a clamshell that was mostly red oak lettuce. It was quite mild. I’ll use the rest in chili.

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#8

I think it’s really a waste to use shishito’s in chili. Best sauteed/grilled coated with oil until blistered and a bit of char, finish with kosher or sea salt, and eaten as a snack.

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#9

Yep, I’ve eaten a lot of shishitos (I love them!) but have yet to find a spicy one. I know there is a chance, but maybe I’ve been lucky? I toss in olive oil stick them in the broiler for a good 2 -3 mins (or about 1- 1.5 mins each side if you want to blister all around, and then salt afterwards. Delicious!

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(saregama) #10

Only 1/10 is spicy, and usually later in the season.

You could actually taste a tiny bit of each (milk or yogurt standing by), and save any spicy ones for chili, eat the rest as is.

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(Eli Paryzer) #11

As everyone says, usually 1/10 are spicy. To be on the safe side just scrape the seeds out of the inside. That is mostly where all of the heat comes from.

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#12

That’s the best part about a bowl of sishitos: PEPPER RUSSIAN ROULETTE

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#13

Padrons on the left, shishito’s on the right.

5_1_pad_v_shis_01

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(erica) #14

Thanks! I’m saving that so I don’t have a painful surprise if padrones are ever in my biweekly box.

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#15

You are welcome! I seem to think of them as more alike then different. Neither are “super hot”. I touch a piece to my lip as I’m chopping, cooking, and deciding. I can imagine for some, even a little bit is too much.

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#16

Wow. I didn’t realize they looked so similar. Thanks for posting!

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#17

Actually, when you see them side by side, each is easily identified.

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#18

Italian Pepperoncino are also very similar.

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#19

This is the article I got the picture from.

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