[Peninsula] Cheung Hing 祥興- Cantonese eats, mostly


#1

Cheung Hing in San Mateo just opened and we stopped by for dinner. Cheung Hing also has branches in SSF and Millbrae.

Since Cheung Hing has a reputation with roasties, we had the roasted duck/ roasted pork combo plate rice. The duck was pretty good with a glistening layer of skin, though the skin was on the rather salty side. The roasted pork looked to be a slab of belly, had a good combination of fat and lean, and also a bit on the salty side.

The claypot rice with salted fish and minced pork. With it being a claypot dish, it took a while to come out, but the amount of soccarat was minimal. The layer of rice next to the pot was a little dry, that’s it. Needed a bit more fire and heat to add to the dry layer.

They also recommended the Shanghai xiao long bao. I asked why and they said they have a Shanghai chef who covered the Shanghai side of the menu. These were decent though I preferred Panda Dumpling’s version in nearby San Carlos.

Also got a plate of sauteed pea sprouts. Pretty standard, a bit fiberish with the weather being a bit warm.

Overall, I think Cheung Hing fills an all-purpose decent Cantonese void along El Camino in the lower Peninsula for those who don’t want to venture into Foster City or trek down to Mountain View/ Sunnyvale. Though I prefer Cooking Papa in general, though not the specific dishes in question. Business was pretty brisk. As in the case of many general purpose Cantonese restaurants, they covers many areas of Cantonese food that normally each be covered by a specialist restaurant in Hong Kong- like a claypot rice shop, a roastie shop, etc. But this being San Mateo, I doubt a specialist restaurant would survive.

How’s the other Cheung Hings in Millbrae and SSF? @Night07 have you been?

Menu:

http://cheunghingonline.com/

And what’s Hoodline doing highlighting all the wrong items? @hyperbowler I can now see what you meant when you said they autogenerate many of these pieces without a byline.


(For the Horde!) #2

Cheung Hings in Millbrae is good. Have fun.


#3

Huh, I never knew they were opening one in San Mateo.

Regarding the Cheung Hing in SSF, I’ve haven’t gone recently. I usually do the set family meals that you can choose like four options and it comes with soup, etc. And the food quality just seemed to be getting lower and lower (didn’t feel fresh) hence why I stopped going. The Milbrae location use to be really dead for dinner though, but I’ve noticed that there’s a brisk crowd. I ate at the Milbrae location about a year ago and I thought they were better than the SSF branch but I wouldn’t say its a fair comparison since I didn’t eat at them around the same time period. I do like their soups though.


#4

What do you eat in Cheung Hing Millbrae?


#5

I like any of their plate rices.


#6

Mainly because I was a little curious at how the Milbrae branch was doing, I went and tried it out for dinner.

Starting off our dinner was their double boiled soup (I heard the waitress mention that its underwater seafloor variant but… I’ve yet to figure out what exactly that entails).

The broth with the nice golden hue warms you right up on these chilly nights. If you couldn’t guess from the giant chicken’s foot sticking out already, the soup has a lip smacking large amount of collagen. I didn’t take a picture of the ingredients but aside from the chicken feet, there were chunks of pork, chicken wings, drumsticks, a few cordyceps, compoy/dried scallops, and a few yellow beans. I actually like their broth quite a lot, quite savory and that collagen lip feel. I had plenty to take home and you can see the soup jiggle out of the container post-refrigeration.

Next up, we had their medium-sized clay pot rice; this time with the shitake mushrooms and chicken variant. I was surprised that the claypot rice came out so fast (we did order it after sitting down and then figuring out the rest of the meal); guessing it might have been cooked in a less traditional manner. However, it had actually a quite nice socarrat bottom without any burnt bits–nice and crunchy. Personally I’d probably order the spare ribs or the traditional preserved meat version of the claypot rice though since I’m not a fan of the thinly cut chicken slices. The mushrooms were still juicy but I found the chicken on the dry end. Note, there are vegetables along with the clay pot that you can sorta see in the picture (they were removed before I thought of taking a picture).

Next up with got the small bbq (2) meat platter with a combo of soy sauce chicken and char siu. I found the cut of the char siu to be a little bit on the leaner end, but still had the savory char siu taste. The soy sauce chicken was actually recently made (had to wait 15 minutes longer and I saw them bring a tray of them out). I’m actually surprised they actually made the soy sauce chicken during the evening hours. Though I like the soy sauce chicken made at Ming Kee more though; seems to have a much more savory soy taste imo. Underneath the char siu and soy sauce chicken was steamed cabbage.

Lastly we got the gai lan with fish cakes. I was pretty disappointed in the execution of the vegetables. Unsure if you can tell from the picture, but gai lan was overcooked and on the softer end. The fish cakes were okay but I found them slightly fishy so eh… I wouldn’t order this again.

Service wise, there really wasn’t a large wait staff so it was a little problematic with getting tea refilled etc. I definitely will come back on the soup alone, but probably try a different set (or do the soup + item and choose an additional 4 dish combo).


#7

Nice! Is their double boiled soup the soup of the day? Or did you have to preorder?

I am also wondering about the underwater variant…

In contrast, the last time i ordered claypot rice in the San Mateo branch, it took more than half an hour for it to come out.


#8

Yeah soup of the day.

Well… that’s what they said, but the only thing from the sea was the dried scallops lol. So I’m not sure what they meant.

Huh, weird. I mean I still enjoyed the rice, wonder if I just got someone else’s clay pot maybe…


#9

LOL. I think then lots of these double boiled soups can be called underwater variant then! I have a hard time thinking about soups where I can’t throw a few of those in!