Peelable Cutting Board: Does it make sense?

I was at Korin (NY) and saw a peel type cutting board. I didn’t buy it, but the concept is interesting. The idea that you don’t have to toss an entire cutting, but rather peel the worn off surface is attractive.

http://korin.com/Peel-Type-Cutting-Board_2

Problem is that these peel type cutting boards are not cheap at all. A 30" X 15" peel type cutting boarding (5 layers) is $280. The 20" X 11" inch is more affordable at $110.

These are Polyvinyl Acetate cutting boards and are more expensive in general.

Sounds like a solution in search of a problem. I’ll stick with our Boos Block.

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for $115 I can buy hella lotta cutting boards at Ikea.

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I was thinking just that. A typical poly board is between $10-20. So from that angle, this is not saving money at all. However, I read that thepolyvinyl acetate cutting boards are in general more expensive than polyethylene boards, so this may make some senses for these expensive cutting boards

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In a word, NO, does not make sense.

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Thanks for the heads-up, CK. I just ordered a “Hi-Soft” cutting board from Amazon Japan and will post my impressions after I’ve had a chance to use it for a while.

I should say, though, that I’m a big fan of the beige rubber cutting boards made by Sani-Tuff (or Asahi here in Japan). They are nice and heavy, they lie flat, knife cuts seem to heal up all by themselves or can easily be sanded out, and the fine matte surface finish means that food doesn’t slide around on the board as you’re trying to cut it. No weird rubber smell either.

I’ll be curious to see how Hi-Soft compares to Sani-Tuff.

no thanks.

I have a Sani-Tuff, but I am not a huge fan of it. I think if you like Sani-Tuff, then you are probably going to like Hi-Soft even more.

I’m curious to know what you don’t like about your Sani-Tuff board. While I prefer end-grain cherry boards for chopping up vegetables, I think rubber boards are great for meat, chicken, and fish.

I have very similar experience as yours. There are indeed a lot of things I like about Sani-Tuff. It is heavy and dense, but not excess. The surface can be renewed by sanding it. It stays very flat. Absolutely no maintenance (no oiling or beeswax needed)…etc. However, all of my knives seem to dull much faster on my Sani-Tuff than any of my wood cutting board. The knives usually cut in a little more in the Sani-Tuff board and have that “sticky” feeling.

Yeah, I know what you mean. That “grabby” feeling is especially noticeable when rock chopping with a really sharp knife, which is why I prefer wood for chopping up vegetables. When using a rubber board, I try to adjust my cutting style more towards push cutting, which is fortuitously more suitable for slicing or chopping meat anyway IMO.

I don’t even use rock chop at all, just push cutting. I have tried to use lighter force which help a little. That is really a minor complaint. The real complaint is that knives get dull faster. Initially, a sharp knife just seem to get that sticky/grabby feeling. Soon after (maybe 1-3 days), the sticky feel will go away, but that is also because the knives are not as sharp.

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold