Leek tops, what do you do with them?

Usually, I used the green part of the leek for soup or stocks. Do you have other use? Please share.

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I use most of the greenish part along with the white (although sliced thinner so it cooks inthe same time). The really tough green part goes in the compost bin.

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Agreed, the green part close to the white parts are edible. Although it’s not easy to clean the dirt without cutting them apart.

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Jacques Pepin demonstrated how to prep a leek so as to maximize utility. He held the leek at its root end and with a SHARP KNIFE cut at sharp angles toward the green/leafy end, carving away the tough outer leaves and EXPOSING tender white interior it was surprising how far the white extended beneath the tough green outer leaves.

You can still use the green shards as you wish, but have a maximum white core.

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I always peel off the outermost layer, which reveal much more white area.

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The dark green parts of a leek are perfectly edible. They seem tough when raw, but they melt into tenderness when cooked. I like them in mapo tofu, but I also sometimes saute or roast them, in whatever preparation I would use the rest of the leek. They just take a couple minutes longer than the white parts to get tender.

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I tie them together and use them as a grill brush for cooking seafood, chicken and steak.

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This is what I do. Then I split it in half vertically and rinse the layers.

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Yes, an excellent source (Jacques Pepin) for prepping leeks.

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Thanks, interesting. I’ve never cut and washed in this way.

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This is slightly different from the method I described that he shared on one of his TV shows. It is essentially shaving shards of the tough green from the stalk. As I wrote, it is amazing how far the white tender leaves extend INSIDE the green exterior leaves.

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I found a recipe on Bon Appetit for using a range of vegetable scraps to make a deeply flavorful vegetable broth. https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/instant-pot-vegetable-stock has the details; the secret is browning the cut halves of two or three onions for a good 2-3 minutes before you start putting in the other ingredients. I stash root ends of scallions, onion skins, celery tops and bottoms, carrot bits, mushroom stems, ginger skins, and leek greens in the freezer, then pull out the Instant Pot when I need more vegetable stock. The leek greens are a key component. All the remainder goes into the compost, but they’ve had a lot of bulk and flavor recovered in that stock.

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Yes I use the right green parts in stock and broth too!

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold