It starts with a sack of besan flour, uses


(Dan) #1

No lie…there is a BRMill sack of besan flour in the pantry just staring me down as I have neglected this product far too long.

Where to begin?

TIA!
Rooster


#2

Socca. Google socca recipes, you will find lots. Soooo good!


(Dan) #3

https://simple-veganista.com/2014/09/socca-farinata.html

I’m reading this. I have had socca and loved it…and never realized it was made with besan flour. Or, maybe…my wife had a hand in this and never mentioned why its been in the pantry…hmmm.

Ok, I’m happy.


#4

I use it primarily for fried items.: pakora, phulkian, and Pakistani/Indian fried chicken.


(saregama) #5

Indian uses:

  • Dhokla (specifically Khaman dhokla)
  • Crepes & pancakes (puda, pudla, chilla, etc)
  • Batter for fried things (Pakodas - just batter or batter with chopped up veggies or fish/chicken dipped in batter; Bhajiyas - like tempura, whole vegetable pieces dipped in the batter and fried)
  • Faux dal (kadhi, pithla, zunkar, etc)
  • Dumplings that go into vegetables or curries (vadi, etc)
  • Sweets, anywhere bengal gram or other lentils might be used
  • Snacks - everything crunchy and fried :wink:
  • Binder (eg in veg kababs)

Non-Indian uses:

  • More crepes and pancakes (socca, farinata, etc)
  • Chickpea “fries” (panelle, panisse, etc)
  • Egg substitute / binder
  • GF flour favorite
  • Ethiopian food (very similar to indian uses… I would love a deep dove on this at some point!)

(Dan) #6

Wow, my besan flour runneth over!


(ChristinaM) #7

I season it like falafel and dredge brined, boneless chicken in it. Pan fry. Serve with tahini, yogurt, pickled beets, etc.


(Dan) #8

Great suggestion, falafel chicken!:+1:


(saregama) #9

My faves are panelle, pancakes of all origins, and bhajiyas (chickpea flour shows its best self in hot oil :grin:)

Oh and I love pithla, which is similar to the Ethiopian lentil paste dishes.


#10

+1 for socca, although be sure to add generous seasonings/herbs or use it as a base for toppings, just plain plain it can be unexciting.

It’s used a lot for vegan frittatas, a little more dense than tofu frittatas but tasty. Something like these- and whatever add egg too if you want- though you’ll prob need additional besan flour to get the right texture . Like any frittata just be careful what veggies you use to be sure they cook through and don’t give off excess liquid.
https://simple-veganista.com/2018/09/mini-chickpea-flour-frittatas.html


#11

If you use it for European recipes, just be aware that it doesn’t taste exactly like European chickpea flour, since it’s made from the smaller Indian/South Asian chickpeas (the same ones that are split to make chana dal), rather than larger “white” chickpeas historically grown and used in southern Europe/around the Mediterranean (which are the only kind that have historically been grown there, as far as I know) . I actually prefer the taste of besan to “chickpea flour” myself, but it’s a slightly stronger/different flavor.

Also, if it’s been staring at you from a shelf for a long time, give your besan a good strong sniff before you use it - it doesn’t have the same sort of extended shelf life that refined white flour does…

ETA: Oh, wait a minute. I just looked at your OP again and saw the “BRmill” bit… is what you have actually labeled “besan” (and yellow/yellow-ish), or “chickpea” (or garbanzo) flour (and pale/ivory colored)? If it’s the latter, it’s probably not actually “besan” in the first place, but made from the larger European chickpeas. In which case, read my post the other way around…:grin: (except the part about it going rancid more quickly than white flour, which is also true of the white/European chickpea flour.)


(Dan) #12

labeled besan and garbanzo did the sniff and taste test. Thxs Mike. Turns out I have both. One was in the freezer.


(saregama) #13

Technically besan is bengal gram flour, sometimes called baby chickpea flour.

You can use them interchangeably, but @MikeG is right about a slight flavor difference.

I also have fava+garbanzo flour that I specially bought for an Ethiopian dish, then realized I could just have used besan. So now I have a Bob’s bag of that too.