How Millennials Killed Mayonnaise

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Good article. I love mayo (Best Foods here in California) and my 31 year old daughter thinks it’s disgusting. So there you go.

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Entertaining read.

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Lol, the punch line is what I was thinking from the moment I saw the article - they love it if you call it aioli!

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Fun read. I have been on and off the flavor fence about mayo. Its always Hellmans but I use a light hand. Now there are so many sandwich spread choices mayo is basically for cold salads and one jar lasts quite awhile.

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Love this bit:
“Just because something is old and white doesn’t mean it’s obsolete. Look at Shakespeare. Look at me.”

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I don’t know if Millennials are killing mayo. Even when I was a college kid, there were several people on my floor stated that they think mayo is disgusting. To this day, I don’t think I know why they said it is disgusting. Maybe it has a lot of fat? Not sure.

Fat- the essence of life!
::sunglasses:

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Generational (and appropriate) jokes aside, at the end of the day it’s Chem Lab you can use. How much oil can the egg yolk absorb in an emulsion? Betcha Julia Child wrote about it before the Millenials were born, no?

Nothing new

I love it but folks in my age bracket either think it’s disgusting or the diet devil

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True, but I feel people want only certain fats like truffle oil (real, not synthetic), extra virgin olive oil, avocado oil or goose fat, not some cheap vegetable oil in mayo. The more expensive and more rare, the better they are.

For example, this avocado mayonnaise can prevent cancer and unemployment.


This truffle mayonnaise is pretty good too. Once you have added black truffle to the mayo, the black truffle just absorb all the toxins from the mayo, leaving you the pure healthy ingredients.

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Same. Hubby and I are in the minority in loving it; little too much, probably.

LOL dead on!

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I’m considering bathing in that…

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I think the article is pretty funny. However, her experience is probably not a good reflection of the country. I looked around, and it appears mayonnaise sale is still growing in US as recent as 2014. Granted that our country population is growing as well, mayo seems to be growing at a good pace, while ketchup, and steak sauce are not growing much.

Now, low fat mayo is definitely growing.
image

https://qz.com/172019/ketchup-isnt-the-king-of-american-condiments-mayonnaise-is/

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Well, first, I’m having a hard time seeing how something with a French name could be the “most American of foodstuffs.” I don’t hate it, but I didn’t grow up with it, so I never think of using it.
Also, I mostly associate it with tuna fish salad , which I really really do hate. I love fish and we ate a lot of it growing up- I couldn’t understand how anyone could stomach that gross tuna out of a can when they could eat fresh fish. I’m not a millennial, btw, I’m a late boomer.

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I was listening to a segment on The Splendid Table this past weekend. Mayonnaise originated in Spain which was news to me.

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Totally adore it, and as a French chef once told me, it’s the only proper way to serve tuna in a Salad Nicoise.

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I feel like they are ruining ice cream too. Halo Top fad anyone?

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What is this all about? Suddenly I’m seeing the stuff everywhere.

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold