Garlic knots and similar items

The northeast pizza place fixture of knotted pizza dough tossed in garlic powder/oil is seldom seen in the SFBA. Flat garlic bread is more common. Who makes it, and is their version any good?

  • @Mr_Happy reports that the focaccia at Tosca is similar to garlic knots
  • Absinthe’s pretzels, nuggets not knots but closer to knots than garlic bread in size and overall experience, are an improvement of the idea, adding pretzel flavors to the mix
  • Presidio pizza on Divisadero has a version similar to what’s on the east coat.
  • Grinders in the Inner Richmond has a version that incorporates giardiniera

Per Yelp, Firehouse Pizza, Hole In the Wall Pizza, Gochees Pizza and Papa John’s Pizza have garlic knots.

On another East Coast red sauce nostalgia note, who’s had a Stromboli out here, and which style, rolled or folded?

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huh, apparently Papa Johns introduced garlic knots in 2015.

I’ve not had a stromboli out here. Also, Sbarros aside, I can’t remember seeing stromboli in Suffolk County until the late 90s-- were they common in NYC or upstate before then? In recent years, I’ve seen something on Long Island called a pinwheel, which is like a cross section of a rolled stromboli baked on it’s side. I’ve definitely not seen those here.

Definitely before the 90s. Wikipedia say they date to the 1950s, with possibly the name first being applied to a stuffed pizza in a Philadelphia suburb in 1950. In reading the Wikipedia article, it occurred to me that the two types of Stromboli (rolled or folded) may be entirely separate creations that happened to be named after the same movie. The folded version seemed to predominate in upstate New York, though the rolled-up version dominates the Google image search. The ones I’m familar with are basically calzone with the tomato sauce on the outside – either in a dipping bowl or ladled over the top.

Didn’t realize you were from Suffolk County. I spent the summer of 1959 in Aquebogue with my cousin’s family.

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