Corn!

Usually I am a proponent of waiting until later in the summer to eat my fill of corn. However I picked some up from Russos on a whim. I didn’t bother to look where was from, but it was pretty good. I’d say a B+ And definitely better than some of the flavorless duds you can get in peak season. It was cold late, but berries and corn are coming in fast, and my garden is thriving with this recent warm spell. Bring in the summer eating!

It seemed like Russos had a higher than normal % of peel and look corn shoppers. These are not my people.

Since last summer I have actually been microwaving most of my corn if not doing it on the grill. In the husk, 4 min for 2 ears. It’s pretty much the only thing I use the microwave for, but it comes out perfect every time.

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This time of year, probably Georgia (or maybe southern Jersey?) Hey if it’s good it’s good.

Here on Long Island, we have our strawberries in few weeks early.

I think it’s much too early for NJ corn. The corn in our local (PA) markets is coming from FL. It’s been okay. Not great, and probably “bred for travel,” but if you’ve gotta have your corn this early, it’s doable.

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it’s WAAY too early for jersey corn.

op: you gambled and won. :grin: last week i bought gorgeous strawberries at green meadow farms. i knew they wouldn’t be local but they looked amazing. well? they sucked.

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Fourth of July is always when our corn is ready here on Long Island. Local strawberries did appear a couple of days ago to my surprise though.

I had a decent experience with the corn at Wilson several days ago. I was making a pasta that calls for frozen corn, but I don’t really love its texture. I figured I would try the fresh corn at Wilson Farm, since the sign in front of it said something like “It’s good.” The corn was tender and sweet, not tons of corn flavor, but considering it’s pretty out-of-season for MA corn, I was pleased and would use it again when local corn is not in season. I don’t remember if it said it was from Florida or Georgia, but it was one of the two states.

I’m pretty sure I’ve tried corn from the same area in our winter with less success, but not disastrous results compared to frozen.

Not the fan favorite choice, but I picked up some bicolor corn from my local Stop & Shop last weekend (not this weekend) and it was super sweet! I was very pleasantly surprised.

Probably needs a separate topic but I’ve been curious about cooking times for corn since following a couple of topics somewhere. On the grill, buttered and re-wrapped in the husk, I find it takes a good 20 minutes + to not be too ‘al dente’ for my taste. Is there a thing about eating corn cooked just a little while and pretty crunchy? Seemed to me most people cook less than 10 minutes, no matter how.

Florida corn is almost at the peak of the season, and it’s been really, really god this year, as are the watermelons and canteloupe.

I definitely like mine with a bit of a snap, rather than on the soft side.

I cook mine in the oven, with only a few layers of husk removed. It takes a good 30 minutes at about 325-350 for my corn to be done. The kernels don’t come out mushy either.

I’ve been know to eat our local corn raw, it’s just that juicy!

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Amen. I always want to say something to those people but I refrain.

Guess I am the overly picky orthorexic type as the idea of corn from an unknown (non organic) grower just means I am buying some glyphosate for dinner. No thanks. But obviously from the crowd around the corn in the grocery store, I am most def in the minority with my worries.

We had corn on Sunday from our local Acme Supermarket, I don’t know the origin. (most likely Fla. would be my guess) I always boil my corn in milk, water and butter and it’s always good. Rarely, I mean I cannot honestly remember the last time corn wasn’t good boiling it in milk and water.

My favorite way is Mexican style, grilled with butter and herbs and spices. The leftover kernels make a fantastic side dish, mixed with cotija cheese and mayo and lime juice, served hot or cold.

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I love you all . . . but maybe we can’t shop for corn together :smiley:

Growing up in Wisconsin, we “learned” (brainwashed, whatever you want to call it) that you only by local and corn that was picked that morning. But of course there were so many corn stands with the fields behind them, that that was easy to do. So buying corn flown in from Florida just makes me shutter a little (though that doesn’t mean it isn’t good, like I said - traditions . . . ) - corn was always “knee high by the 4th of July” . . . so corn season wasn’t until late July, May seems so early for corn - though I am craving it after reading all this and may be willing to try some just to see . . . maybe not . . . maybe. . . . ahhhhh

And . . . . I’m a peel back the tip of the ear to make sure the kernels are full to the tip of the ear . . . sorry to offend - old habits die hard.

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I was just telling this story a couple weeks ago at a family reunion in North Carolina. I had an uncle and aunt who owned a huge dairy farm, and on their farm they also had a very large produce “garden”. They pretty much “lived off their land” type situation. Anyway we were having dinner they and my aunt gave me a bag and told me to go outside into her “garden” and pick whatever I wanted to have as side dish(s). I remember the corn and getting “lost” in it…pretty grossed out by “picking” my own food, dirty, bugs it was completely foreign to me.

I remember actually asking if they didn’t have any “clean” food in the can I could have. LOL

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I was also a fan of eating it raw right off the stalk when I grew my own Silver Queen for a few years living in Central Jersey. Incredibly good. Now it’s still hard and getting worse to be able to find Silver Queen here in New England. Rarely Wilson’s in Lexington has it in late August or early September, and my sister gets it at Peter’s Farm in Salem NH some years.

The other thing I miss from New Jersey’s longer growing season is being able to grow sensational full-size watermelons.

Jersey had great corn and tomatoes. I’ll have to look for that at Wilson’s this year.

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold