Chile Verde/Green Chile Stew

I’m a fan and a convert ever since moving to Arizona long ago.
How about any tasty recipes, traditional or improvised, doesn’t matter to me. Let’s have at it! :smiley:

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Can’t ever decide which is better so I always order Christmas (e.g. One enchilada w/chili verde, one w/chili colorado.)
Thanks for this thread. For some whacky reason we got a batch of Hatch chilis in at the local market (Pittsburgh) & I flamed 'em & froze them last year.
Right off the bat I say: cornbread.

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I learned to love Green Chile Stew on many visits to New Mexico. I make it pretty often, and it’s not complicated. If you go to the Santa Fe School of Cooking’s web site and click on Recipes, there are three for Green Chile Stew.

https://santafeschoolofcooking.com/Recipes/Archived_Recipes/

I’ve also used this one from New Mexico Magazine:. You’ll need to scroll down to get to it:

http://www.nmmagazine.com/article/?aid=97641#.WLHEIDsrJPY

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You remind me that I still have 3 lbs of green chiles in the freezer from last August’s harvest. I make this recipe from The Pink Adobe in Santa Fe several times a year. I use 3 or 4 X the amount of chiles though, I like it hot. I serve it with tortillas toasted in a sautee pan, butter and grated asadero cheese.

Oddly, I went to the PInk Adobe in December and did not order this.

The Recipe

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Ok, from the Chambers Rangers forum, I don’t have recipes but who needs such:
Green chili buffalo burgers
Green chili meatloaf
Green chili oven fries
Well heck yeah!

You say you are in Arizona. Then, just as an overview, want to tell you that there are two most-common types of Green Chile Stew - New Mexico, and basically everybody else. The ‘everybody else’ variety commonly uses tomatillos in addition to the green chiles. Most of the New Mexico versions do not.

So, if you’re experimenting, keep that in mind.

I’ve been making the New Mexico version, no tomatillos, for several decades, but it’s all good.

My version is pretty-much the same as the Pink Adobe recipe linked above, but I add potatoes, like the Santa Fe Cooking School recipes also linked above. And, at the last minute, stir in a can of green peas.

Here is a link to an excellent recipe for the Mexico/Arizona/Texas/Everywhere-but-New Mexico-with-tomatillos version: http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexico_cooks/2011/02/carne-de-cerdo-en-salsa-verde-pork-in-green-sauce-mexico-cooks-favorite-main-dish-for-parties.html

But it’s really just a meat stew with chiles added so, whatever you like in your basic stews (pork, beef, lamb, etc.), you’ll probably like in your Green Chile Stew. Next time you’re making your basic beef stew for your family, throw in a couple of cans of green chiles. If you’re cooking for little kids, use mild green chiles, and plenty of them. It’s the green chiles that give the stew its flavor.

Oh, and, there’s a difference between the meat main dish - Chile Verde/Green Chile Stew - and the Chile Verde that’s just stewed green chiles. As in green chile sauce. As in what these other folks are putting on burgers, enchiladas, etc. You can make quite a tasty dinner by ladling leftover Green Chile Stew over baked potatoes. But it’s way too ‘hearty’ to add to hamburgers.

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Hey Jaymes, I moved from KC to Scottsdale circa 85. I’ve lived in Southern Oregon for a while now.
I agree pretty much with your definitions. I’m not strict, however.
They way I was taught was that GCS
was peppers pork and potatoes and Chike Verde was blended with tomatillos.
As I learned from my wife’s native compatriots, roasting the tomatillos and onions along with the peppers was a new way of life. The secret I learned from them was to squeeze whatever citrus was on hand, always abundant in lower Arizona. Adds a a whole different dimension and really nice with chicken and seafood. Dungeness up here in Oregon, for instance.
And agreed about the Chile Verde served as a side condiment. Love it too. Hard to screw up green chiles.

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Why bbqboy, you already know plenty about Chile Verde/Green Chile Stew. Not sure why you’re asking.

Green chili came up in a thread on NJ chili and I volunteered to make a thread on my favorite style. And here we are. :slight_smile:

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And I barged in w/comments relating to green chilis per se. Sorry! An under-used source of great flavor in my book. Thankful for this thread to learn about the fine distinctions between adjacent regional uses.
Love the comment about making stew for “little kids” with mild chilis. Put me in the category of a very elderly small child. Spent years eating Hunanese food in SF, tears running down my cheeks, a kleenex in one hand and a cold beer in the other. . . And still my first mouthful of GST in Santa Fe ca. 1982 was quite a surprise! But the old hippies got a laugh.

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Well if this thread is good enough for Jaymes, it’s good enough for me.

I picked up a pork butt at Fiesta yesterday ($0.97/lb), and some frozen Hatch peppers at Trader Joe’s.

I made the last batch with jalapenos and poblanos, and it was pretty darned good. I’ll probably do this in the next couple of days.

Let’s eat.

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Oh jeez, Jammie. I’m happy for all tales, remembrances, ideas, recipes, whatever. I’d been eating Tex-Mex since I was a swaddled babe. Discovering other styles of Mexico/ SW cuisine changed my life. I’d just never associated green and vegetables with Mexican food. And now that I’ve been up in the PNW the variation is wider still.

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I was the one who brought up green chili in a discussion of chili in NJ. Here’s my recipe:

Saute a chopped onion and 2 chopped cloves of garlic 3 minutes. Add 2 chopped jalapenos and 2 or 3 chopped green peppers; saute another 3 minutes.

Add one pound cooked shredded chicken, 2 cups chicken broth, 5 chopped tomatillos, 1 or 2 drained cans of canellini (white kidney) beans, l tsp oregano, 2 tsp ground red chilis (*), 1 tsp cumin, 1/2 tsp paprika, and 1/4 tsp cinnamon to the pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer about 2 hours.

(*) This is NOT that American abomination called “chili powder”, but 100% ground chilis; I get mine at the Indian grocery store.

You can omit the beans or vary the various vegetables and spices to taste. I’m pretty sure I increased the number of tomatillos over whatever the original I was working from had.

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Sounds wonderful, Evelyn. I don’t think I’ve ever put beans in.
As an aside, I’ve had good examples as far North as Wyoming and here in Oregon where tomatillos grow profusely.

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I’ve been using a pork tenderloin cut up in pieces. Fork tender.

I wish I liked tomatillos, they are too…je ne sais pas… bitter or tart or something.

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Yeah, but there’s no fat on a tenderloin!

The horror…the horror…

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I KNOW!! It surprised me too!

I have made the meat part separately
a fair amount of the time. I never really
make it the same way twice. Always seat of the pants.
I will say that the one thing I always do is roast the tomatillos in husk either over flame or in a roasting pan in the oven partially filled with water or beer
so they roast and steam together.
Then hold by stem and squish. :slight_smile:
The citrus element always adds a depth that I love. When I lived in Scottsdale, there were trees in lots of neighborhoods. Folks would just put buckets of citrus out on the curb. Don’t know if it is still so.
I now wonder how preserved lemon mentioned in the revelations thread might be a good addition.

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Quoting myself but whatever.

Got my Green Pork Chili on to simmer.

Roughly:

3lbs Pork Butt Cut Into 1" to 1 1/2" Cubes and browned, (I rendered some of the fat cap I trimmed to brown the cubes)
1 and 1/2 onions coarsely chopped
1 Poblano stemmed, seeded and diced (raw)
1 Jalapeno, stemmed, seeded and diced raw
2 Thai Chiles stemmed, seeded and diced raw
1 small can Chopped Green Chiles
1 Can Mexican Style Corn
3 Small Leeks, White Part Only
4 Green Onions Chopped, (Green part only)
1/2 lb Thawed Hatch Peppers, (Roasted and chopped)
Chicken Stock
1 Tbsp Mexican Oregano
1 Tbsp Dried Cilantro

Browned the pork and removed from pot
Sauteed the onions and the raw chopped peppers in the reserved fat
Sprinkled in a couple of Tbsps flour and stirred for about two minutes
Stirred in chicken stock
Added canned and thawed peppers
Everything else.
Bring to simmer and cook on low until meat is tender, about two to two and a half hours.

Serve with warm tortillas.

MMmmmmmmm.

(Too bad it’s like 80’ here today.)

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Arrgh! I forgot to include the last step of adding cilantro (which was on a new page). Here’s the full recipe:

Saute a chopped onion and 2 chopped cloves of garlic 3 minutes. Add 2 chopped jalapenos and 2 or 3 chopped green peppers; saute another 3 minutes.

Add one pound cooked shredded chicken, 2 cups chicken broth, 5 chopped tomatillos, 1 or 2 drained cans of canellini (white kidney) beans, l tsp oregano, 2 tsp ground red chilis (*), 1 tsp cumin, 1/2 tsp paprika, and 1/4 tsp cinnamon to the pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer about 2 hours.

Mix in 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro.

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

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