Any Nutella fans, has anyone noticed a difference?


#1

(For the Horde!) #2

I big fan of Nutella. I haven’t noticed the taste change… and probably vast majority of people did not.


#3

Looks like the real adjustment is the lowering of cacao. Not difficult to know why.

I stopped consuming Nutella, knowing that it uses palm oil. I prefer the organic Nocciolata, taste better.


#4

just checked out nocciolata. the first ingredient is still sugar, which is why i’ve been making my own for years. first ingredient: hazelnuts (sometimes, hazelnuts and almonds).


(Anti Everything :@)) :@)) ) #5

I would taste only the sugar.

And that’s why I make my own every saturday, only 2 ingredients: macadamia nuts and chocolate. Takes no more than 3 minutes. Melting the chocolate in the microwave takes the longest.


#6

i love dark chocolate, but the 99% is too bitter for my taste. i use 100 grams of 72% (sometimes 85%) chocolate per pound of nuts, plus a tablespoon of cocoa, teaspoon of espresso powder, pinch of salt and splash of vanilla.


#7

To counter the ever-increasing price of chocolate, they upped the milk powder content from 7.5 percent to 8.7 percent and the sugar content from 55.9 percent to 56.3 percent. Which, is pretty minuscule in the grand scheme of things. The change does however lightly lessen the dark color of the creamy spread to a lighter hue of brown. All of this combined made lovers of the sweet spread very unhappy. And people did what people do in 2017. They took to Twitter to complain, cry, and protest … about the 1.6 percent cacao decrease, just so we’re absolutely clear on what’s happening here.

People go nuts, now the balance of nut and chocolate is no good!


(Dan) #8

In October, I read that the availabilty of Turkish hazelnuts was creating an issue for the makers of Nutella. Could increasing the amount of powdered milk make up for the amount of hazelnuts in each jar? I don’t consume the product enough to know if I could detect a significant diff but the ever shrinking size of jars and cans I typically notice more.

I agree with the member who makes their own Nutella spraed. If you enjoy hazelnuts why not control the recipe yourself. We sometimes make our own nut butters for the same reason.


#9

According to what I have been reading, it’s a chocolate price problem. They are foreseeing another change of recipe to deal with a possibility of hazelnut shortage in the future.

Agreed! And especially with lesser sugar.


#10

@wonderwoman @Presunto

Neither of your recipes show oil or fat, why Ferrero adds so much oil in the Nutella recipe?


(For the Horde!) #11

Ferrero will do fine (Nutella’s manufacturer). These days with internet, a few loud voices can seem like a bigger news than they really are. For example, I remember there were a lot of complaints about the All Day Breakfast from McDonald, but in fact, All Day Breakfast unmistakably help increased profit margin and improved the brand image.

You will always have some complaints about a change of recipe. Will it really materialized into anything big? Time will tell, but I doubt it. People who did not like Nutella from the beginning were never their customers to be begin with. People who liked Nutella will likely stay with it.

Ferrero has been doing pretty well in the last decade or so.

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A bigger concern is the Palm Oil claim.


#12

nutella’s first ingredient is sugar. which, along with the cocoa and dried milk, would absorb all of the oil released by the relatively small amount of hazelnuts (13%). so the oil is needed for a spreadable consistancy.

by simply grinding the nuts and adding a bit of cocoa powder along with the melted chocolate nothing absorbs the nut oil and cocoa butter in the chocolate.


#13

I might as well try to make my own spread. In your recipe, what is your nut to chocolate ratio?


(Dan) #14

I recall a class action suit over the marketing of Nutella to familys when the company advertised the spread as being part of a healthy breakfast. The outcome made the lawyers a bundle no doubt but Nutella only changed a few words regarding ads.

I am sure the price of chocolate as mentioned, supply of nuts and recipe changes are to be expected reactions once publicized to the public.

Has anyone noticed a big price change yet?


#15

100 grams of 72% (sometimes 85%) chocolate per pound of nuts, plus a tablespoon of cocoa, teaspoon of espresso powder, pinch of salt and splash of vanilla.

grind the nuts (i often use a conbination of roasted almonds and hazelnuts) until they become nut butter. add cocoa, espresso powder (optional), salt and vanilla. process until mixed. scrap bowl, add melted chocolate and process. makes about 2 1/2 cups.


(For the Horde!) #16

Yep. I believe you are right about the Nutella advertised itself as part of a healthy breakfast. Chocolate is getting expensive, so is the hazelnut – but a bit of up and then down. I haven’t noticed a price hike from Nutella yet. At the end of the day though, people may not want to admit it, but they like sugar/sweet. They sell. Ferrero probably also thinks the newer generation wants sweeter spread too. Ferrero won’t say it, but that is probably what they are thinking.

I was just at Eataly (Flatiron) a couple weeks ago. The lady got a crepe filled with Nutella spread. She then went back to the cook and asked for more Nutella. In my mind, I was… “How much more do you want?” The cook said “I put a lot of Nutella on it already”. She insisted that she wants more.

Nutella has a few competitors, but I really doubt any of them can come close. Realistically, what do we have?Hersey spread and Jiff spread? I doubt they can take advantage of this. Hersey spread is rough and dry.

Justin’s? Justin’s is about 2.5 times more expensive. Nutella and Justin’s are not targeting the same audience.


#17

Ditalia is pushing this
http://www.nocciolatausa.com/product.htm


(For the Horde!) #18

Look good. The price is a little more expensive, but not like Justin’s $8 per 10 oz jar. Nocciolata has less sugar than Nutella, but not a lot less – 18 g sugar per serving as opposed to 21 g. Definitely worth trying.

My humble view is that… unless Nutella or Nocciolata is using something toxic (the palm oil thing), then I don’t overthink this. First, recognize Nutella for what it is. It is a spreadable candy. Second, Nutella shouldn’t be my regular diet in the first place. If I am consuming Nutella daily or near daily, then yes, then I should be concern of its sugar content. However, for most people, Nutella should be less than 0.1% of what you totally consuming.


#19

I used to work one of the LPGA tournaments (JAL) when it was in New Rochelle, NY. There was one young Italian golfer who when everyone else was gorging on cheese, fruit, French toast, scrambled eggs… you get it, would whip out her personal jar of Nutella and smear it on toast, she was good to go, it was her breakfast and lunch every single day. She was fit as a fiddle, but she did have youth and tons of exercise going for her.


(For the Horde!) #20

:grin: Youth is indeed priceless. Maybe she liked her Italian Nutella and bought her own. Afterall, there is a difference between the European Nutella and the American Nutella. Here is a visible difference (European left, American right)

“One last point I want to mention: viscosity. Look at the difference between the European (left) and American (right) versions. This is after they sat for oh about 30 minutes or so.”

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