2021 California Food Journalism and News [SF Bay Area, Los Angeles, the rest of California and Northern Nevada]

“This role will primarily focus on finding stories in Bay Area cities outside of San Francisco, with an eye on cities in the East Bay (beyond hot spots such as Oakland and Berkeley) and the South Bay.”

RESTAURANTS FEATURED!

BOPO
https://www.yelp.com/biz/bopomofo-caf…
CHHEAS KITCHEN
https://www.yelp.com/biz/the-chheas-k…

HUE 5 STARS

https://www.yelp.com/biz/5-stars-hue-…
ACE BURGER

https://www.yelp.com/biz/ace-burger-a…
MEET QIN NOODLE
https://www.yelp.com/biz/meet-qin-noo… JAY BIRD https://www.yelp.com/biz/jay-birds-ch…
YOMIE’S RICE YOGURT
https://www.yelp.com/biz/yomies-rice-…

NOODLE ST
https://www.yelp.com/biz/noodle-st-ar…
LAVA LAND
https://www.yelp.com/biz/aliya-lavala…

HO KEE CART

https://www.yelp.com/biz/ho-kee-cart-…

Hawaiian Shrimp with Cambodian flavors, Hue Vietnamese food, Rice Yogurt Drink, Xi’An Noodles,

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Avery Coburn, 5, left, holding a super burrito from Tacos Sinaloa in Oakland, and (right) the 16-inch super burrito, both photographed in the Chronicle studio in San Francisco.

Carlos Avila Gonzalez/The Chronicle

[John] Birdsall, who has written for The Chronicle in the past, has his own theory about the Oakland super’s origin: It’s a firing shot in the long-standing beef between Oakland and San Francisco.

“SF, the Mission, was burrito territory, and Oakland was taco territory, Birdsall wrote in an email. “At lowrider shows guys from Oakland and SF would taunt each other about eating either tacos or burritos. I suspect, and this is only a hunch, that the Oakland super burrito is part of some Oakland burn of SF: that Oakland can do a burrito better — on a grander scale — than the Mission can. That the super burrito is the ultimate Oakland throwdown.”

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Bill Addison in the LA Times this morning on the 50th anniversary of Chez Panisse -

excerpt:

Is the greatest legacy of Chez Panisse on the page rather than on the plate? The blurred lines of homey cooking, community symbiosis and professional skill that the restaurant embodies come into clearest focus in cookbooks. Chez Panisse may live on most usefully and poignantly in the words of the chefs who’ve graduated from its kitchens. Samin Nosrat’s “Salt Fat Acid Heat” might be the most exuberant and approachable book on cooking technique written in the English language. David Lebovitz, writing definitively on dessert and on his life in Paris, is the less-grouchy Olney of our generation. The poetry with which Tamar Adler considers her cooking life in “An Everlasting Meal” never gets stale. Hometown L.A. hero Suzanne Goin reached a national audience with her “Sunday Suppers at Lucques,” a distillation of menus from the weekly, deeply welcoming dinner series (served at her now-closed flagship restaurant) that built on the Chez Panisse ethos in her own style.

Tiffany Carter, founder and chef, Boug Cali and Luke Tsai, food editor, KQED,
discuss garlic noodle on KQED Forum with host Alexis Madrigal for 19 minutes -

The owners hope to open by the end of the year -

The East Bay is getting a new Taiwanese restaurant specializing in dumplings and other street food made with local ingredients.

The dumpling spot is taking over the former Yuzu Ramen & Broffee at 1298 65th St., Suite 1, Emeryville — a 2,000-square-foot space with a large open kitchen, long bar and outdoor patio. When the restaurant debuts, it will serve pop-up staples like slender, crispy-bottom pot stickers filled with basil and chicken; spicy, saucey pork wontons; and fluffy bao sandwiches filled with pan-fried tofu and pickles, all alongside local beers. It will also expand into more complicated banquet-style Taiwanese dishes rarely seen in this part of the Bay Area.

What you’ll need to succeed

  • 4+ years of experience of editing and writing about food, preferably in the Bay Area
  • Demonstrable editing and writing chops
  • A passion for food and the food business and understanding of how food underpins community.
  • A vision of how to best serve our audiences that aligns with our mission.
  • A creative and open-minded approach to how Nosh can fulfill its mission and reach a wide range of audiences.
  • Preference to be based in the East Bay
  • An ability to do regular on-the-ground reporting and scouting on the East Bay food scene

How we’ll support you

  • Top-notch in-house mentorship and a transparent internal review and feedback process
  • $1,000 in support each year for conferences and training
  • We offer a salary of $90,000, health plan (including dental and vision), four weeks of paid leave and a 401(k) match.

The job is based in the Bay Area. The deadline for applications is Sept. 20, 2021. Apply for this position.

Reem Assil in Eater -

Having been behind the curtains of fine dining establishments, I can say that there is no greater myth than that of the all-knowing chef bestowing magic and wisdom on the rest of the team. In reality, everything coming out of a restaurant kitchen — from the recipes to the plating — is a compilation of so many people, and often, it’s the cooks who are actually running the show. To continue to lean on the idea of a genius chef, as a leader to be followed, renders everyone else in the system invisible. It strips them of their contributions and gives a chef a false authority. It upholds a power imbalance that implies to be a chef is a solo act, which can lead some chefs to mistreat their team — yes, even the kindest chefs.

I was wondering what all the construction was about and why there are so many empty storefronts! 10 new restaurants, and most will be open past midnight. In that area, if you want something to eat late at night, it’s Daimo or Nation’s.

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At Bopomofo Cafe in San Gabriel, California—a Los Angeles neighborhood that is inundated with boba shops—the food is less traditional, standing out among the sea of other tea cafes. “Boba places are a dime a dozen, there’s so many,” explains Philip Wang, one of the cofounders of Bopomofo. “We do have food and it’s not just your typical stuff.” On the menu, you’ll find a honey walnut shrimp burger and tater tots drowned in spicy mapo tofu. (Though a more traditional family recipe for lu rou fan, or braised pork rice, does make the cut.)

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Bill Addison in the Los Angeles Times -

The Ultimate ARMENIAN FOOD TOUR in Glendale!! Kebabs, Lavash & Love Cake | Los Angeles, California

Eating INDIAN FOOD for 24 HOURS in LOS ANGELES!! Lamb Shank Curry & DTLA Butter Frankie | California

It’s too bad the “where to get Jewish food for the High Holidays” guide doesn’t think that anything exists in the East Bay outside of Oakland and Berkeley (I guess Richmond is an extension of Berkeley). As Kneaded Bakery in San Leandro, whose owner and chief baker is Jewish, is offering 3 types of round challah for Rosh Hashanah, as well as a package that contains a plain challah, local honey, and 1 1/2 pounds of apples.

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Luke on Fall Food Festivals -

Oakland Little Saigon Mid-Autumn Festival

Clinton Park, Oakland
September 18, 2021, noon–5pm

Details here

K-Food Gochujang Festival

Presidio of San Francisco, Presidio Theatre Outdoor Plaza
September 18, 2021, 11am–2pm

Details here

LumpiaPalooza

District Six, 428 11th Street, San Francisco
Oct. 23–Oct. 24, 2021

Details here

Día de los Muertos Festival and Fruitvale Restaurant Week

International Boulevard, from Fruitvale Ave. to 40th Ave., Oakland
Oct. 25–Oct. 31, 2021

Details here

New for Berkeley and Oakland -

Dumpling Hours , 1389 B North Main St. (inside the Phillips Building), Walnut Creek

Limon , 2450 Valdez St. (at 26th Street), Oakland

Palestinian-inspired California plates for breakfast, lunch and weekend brunch for now. (Check out the beautiful mezze board). Lulu Berkeley , 1019 Camelia St. (at 10th Street), Berkeley

French and Algerian pastries at Belmo Cafe * 1160 University Ave. (between San Pablo Avenue and Curtis Street), Berkeley*

Espinas describes this “personal project” as a neighborhood bar with more complex food offerings, including oysters and a charcuterie plate. There are also sly takes on snacks like maple-roasted bar nuts and the “Caesar Eggs,” devilled eggs with anchovy-and-sheep’s-milk cheese.

The Lede, open Wednesday to Thursday, 4–9pm, and Friday to Saturday, 4–10pm. 308 41st St., Oakland. info@theledeoakland.com. theledeoakland.com

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Chicken liver tostada with sour cherry chamoy, fried onions & chives

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Jonathan Kauffman is a James Beard Award-winning food journalist, a former San Francisco Chronicle reporter, and the author of Hippie Food , a history of the 1970s natural-foods movement. Follow him on Twitter. Follow Resy, too.

1 Dai Bao at Ma’s Dimsum and Cafe
2 Yi Fu Wontons at Far East Cafe
3 Roasted Pork (sort of) at New Lun Ting Cafe
4 Tomato Beef Chow Mein with Curry Powder at
Capital Restaurant

5 Chicken Drummettes at New Golden Daisy
6 Diana’s Meat Pie Special at Henry’s Hunan

San Francisco’s only Guamanian restaurant

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The Chinatown Autumn Moon Festival is a yearly celebration in San Francisco. The 2021 event is a two day on September 11 & 12 and runs from 11am - 5pm both days.

“This colorful event features a parade, live entertainment, arts & crafts, and a variety of food and drinks. There is so much to do that you could easily spend both days here and want more. All activities take place along Grant Avenue in the heart of Chinatown.”

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From Bay Area chef Tu David Phu on PBS Newshour today -

from TrulyCA on KQED a few weeks ago-

from YouTube -

In ‘Bloodline’, Bay Area chef Tu David Phu discovers that the lessons learned in his family kitchen run deeper than his formal training.

The film joins Phu just as he returns home to Oakland, California after being a contestant on the competitive cooking series, Top Chef (Season 15). As he and his parents prepare a Saturday dinner, drawing on his mother’s self-taught culinary repertoire (which began in a Thai refugee camp), and his father’s ancestry as a free-diver and fishmonger from Phú Quốc, Vietnam, Tu reflects on his visibility as a “celebrity chef,” tracing how he went from refugee roots and a childhood in West Oakland, to this new life by relying on things learned from his family kitchen–rather than the “formal” skills and training learned in culinary school–including how to turn something “inedible,” such as fish bloodline, into a beautiful dish.

A film by James Q. Chan and Santhosh Daniel

Bloodline is now available on your local PBS Channel. Check your local listings.

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Making noodles. Phongdien Town, Cantho City, Southern Vietnam.
Credit: CiaoHo