The risky business of complaining about restaurant food

http://www.northwestcaterer.co.uk/2017/03/13/pub-chef-wielded-knife-after-complaints-about-food/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pub-chef-wielded-knife-after-complaints-about-food

Gee! This is dangerous!

Personal experience: we went to a noodle joint Les Pâtes Vivante for dinner in the Paris 9, my noodle arrived instantly, when husband saw me finishing my bowl, he asked the waiter what happened to his? It was like 25 minutes we had sat down. We waited for another 10 minutes, still nothing. So we told them we would like to cancel the order and we went to pay. We were calm and polite. Not only the manager at the cashier didn’t apologise but started criticising my husband saying when he arrived at the restaurant he didn’t show a happy face! We said what had this to do with them and how was it related to the fact that the noodle didn’t arrive. The guy started turning crazy and more accusations. We said we would complain to his boss. Then suddenly the guy calmed down a bit and said he would offer the meal. My husband refused the ‘gift’, we paid, and never went back.

It was the type of restaurant when they get some success, they become arrogant.
Still we went to a restaurant to be scolded, incredible.

Some places don’t seem to grasp the basic concept of the industry they are in - hospitality.

Permit me to augment your statement: Some places, and individuals, don’t seem to grasp the ‘hospitality’ concept. True! I have been saying that for years and it runs the gamut from restaurant to restaurant. On the other hand, everyone it seems has become a ‘critic’, with comments that run the gamut from infantile to knowledgeable, with plenty of platforms to speak their piece.
Restaurants have a lot to deal with…in the case you put forward the chef obviously had serious issues.

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“There’s another side to his character. He’s a graduate and references say he’s intelligent and caring. It’s a tragedy he’s here.”

Sevilla, who was already in prison for other offences . . . you have a long history of violent offences and committed these offences while on bail"

Moral of the story: Don’t hire a person with a history of violence to work around alcohol and sharp knives?

I generally don’t, for fear of them spitting into my food when they take it back to the kitchen…

I recommend reading the story with a cockney accent. It’s quite entertaining that way.

Cuckoo!

How so?

Now I know many foreigners can be geographically challenged when it come to the regions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland but we don’t speak like sterotypical Londoners here in the northwest. By the by, I know the Puss in Boots quite well - a pal and I used to visit regularly to play darts - it’s only 13 miles away from home.

Because cockney is funny sounding to american ears and when they say serious things it sounds flippant and that makes me smile. I’m not talking Michael Caine cockney, that’s scary cockney, I’m talking Eliza Doolittle.

Also not implying that the region of the story speaks cockney.

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold