[Seattle] Ballard Farmers Market

Ballard Farmers Market is the oldest farmers market in Seattle. We visited the market in late June, early July.

Tall Grass Bakery stand. Yummy raisin cherry walnut scone, and olive bread. Thanks to the Seattle posters who pointed me to Tall Grass.

Smoked salmon here was quite tasty, but oh so pricey at $39/lb!

Plenty of mushrooms.

Another fish stand:

Fruits and jam:

The Ayako Family Jam offerings were seriously tasty. We bought a jar of ruby plum home. Tart, sweet, perfect balance. Its also the priciest jam I ever bought for the size. But seriously try out the samples, they were real good.

If you are flying home with the jam, TSA will not let you bring it jam on carryons. We were late for the flight, and had to divide the jam into 3 containers (2 were just water bottles), and went through xray a second time so they would let us bring it. It was silly. We were the last to get on the flight.

Seabeans, and some giant morels:

Scapes. I don’t see these in the SF Bay Area. But its scapes season in Seattle so a few stands had it.

Great caramels. Especially liked the sea salt and key lime ones. So we bought a box each. Good stuff.

Green walnuts:

One of the meat store carries this:

Canned tuna:

Bakery. How’s this one?

Some organic produce:

San Juan Island sea salt. How’s their salt? I didn’t try since they just kinda ignored me.

Meat:

Oysters:

Berries. No samples here unfortunately. I guess there were too many tourists?

The best stone fruit stand at the market. The flavors and complexity were outstanding. Bought a bag of a variety of stone fruits.

Overall, I thought the market is quite interesting, although it seems to be quite a tourist destination- there is a large number of prepared food stands and fewer produce stands. The variety of produce is less than I expected. Not many people were lugging their produce bags/ carts around and there were lots of people milling around eating food.

What other stands do you like at the Ballard market?

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold