Onion recall, US and Canada July 31, 2020

ONIONS grown by Thompson Int’l, Bakersfield sited for salmonella. Sold in British Columbia and inn US.

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Wow!

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According to the article, Michigan is not on the shipped to list for that supplier. I’m grateful. But… I think I’ll take a pass buying red onions for a while, anyway.

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The latest news headline I saw said these onions are pretty much in all the states, but how do we know where the onions come from? I’ve never purchased a whole bag of onions, so I go for the loose ones in the grocery bins. There’s no info on where these are grown or what farm they come from. :confused:

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This was posted in the other onion thread. It lists the brand names they are sold under. Check against the sticker on your onion if it has one.

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Thanks for the post. I thought we were in the clear because first reports didn’t include Michigan as a destination for these onions. I’ll have to toss a gallon baggie of white and yellow onions I’ve been cooking with for the past week.

Thanks. I always buy the loose onions in the bins, so I’ve never seen a sticker on mine. Guess they’ll all have to go into the trash bins now. :frowning_face:

I tried Googling, but found nothing. Does anyone know if people have been getting sick from cooked  onions, or is it mostly/just from those eaten raw? (Or other foods cross-contaminated by raw onions.) I mean, I know red onions are most often eaten raw, but I am curious about the blanket recommendation to toss basically any  onion you can’t be sure hasn’t come in contact with the questionable ones because of potential cross-contamination.

If you’re cooking with yellow or white onions that only “might” have been cross-contaminated anyway, is the potential contamination involved here so extreme that the “proper cooking” we’re routinely told is perfectly adequate to deal with what has basically become an expectation  of some degree of Salmonella contamination of “factory chicken”, for example, wouldn’t take of the problem?

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I saw an article stated that if you cooked it and ate it, you’ll be fine because the salmonella will not survive the heat. Definitely do not eat raw (no burger toppings or salads, etc.). But they are still recommending that people toss those onions you’re unsure about because the risk of cross-contamination when it is uncooked is great. Many cooks (myself included) aren’t always washing and cleaning your knife and cutting board after cutting onions, but before you cut other vegetables, so you could be transferring that salmonella to other items.

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Brands recalled

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OK, thanks. I couldn’t see how it could harmful if they were cooked, so it seemed awfully strange that none of the official warnings/advisories seem to mention that at all. Everything I saw just seemed to be saying “if there’s the slightest possibility any  of your onions came in contact with these onions, throw everything away!!” Which I found strange considering how readily the same authorities accept that pretty much all the raw meat in the US’s “mass market” distribution chain is more or less guaranteed to have some  measurable Salmonella or E. coli contamination, but that’s  “no big deal” - everyone should it all to an internal temperature of 165F… :roll_eyes:/:open_mouth:

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Typo = “everyone should just cook  it all to an internal temperature of 165F”

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold