[London, Tooting] Decent Pashtun/Peshwari/Afghan grilled meats, curries, and naan

A visit a couple of weeks ago to Namak Mandi at 25 Upper Tooting Road. Although they have carpeted areas where you can dine sitting on the floor, my dodgy knee wasn’t up to this so we sat at a regular table.

We shared two curries. Sarsoon ka saag was rich and savoury, with well-browned onions. Lamb karahi was on the bone, and had connective tissue bits as well as muscle meat; all was nicely tender while still having enough chew to be interesting.

From their grill section, chapli kebab had a good texture, moist but not greasy, and the whole cumin and coriander seeds gave extra flavour.

Afghan naan was so large it was served on its own special stand. It stayed good throughout our meal rather than going stale as it cooled — a sign of being freshly cooked rather than reheated.

The menu (photo) is very short so perhaps doesn’t bear much more exploration, but I’d happily go back at least once.

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I had similar feelings about an Afghan place in Manchester. OK but nothing to rave over.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s certainly worth a try, particularly for those whose joints will let them sit on the floor. Though there’s plenty more interesting stuff to explore in Tooting — Dosa N Chutny [sic] is one I need to get to at some point.

When I lived more over that side of London, I used to enjoy Pakhtoonkhwa in Green Street, just round the corner from the (old?) West Ham stadium at Upton Park. The menu was a bit anything-you-like-so-long-as-it’s-lamb but they really knew their way around a lamb! Fabulous chops and curries.

And afterwards you could wander out onto the pavement and throw the bones at any passing Man U bus.

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Thanks — I checked my list and see I already have that on my radar from a JFores post at Chowhound in 2012! Good to hear an additional opinion.

I actually pass through Upton Park twice on Mondays, but that’s once at 7:15am and once after 10 hours solo childcare when all I want to do is get home…

“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold