[Kuala Lumpur] Breakfast options at Lontong & Such

Lontong & Such is a small, bright one-year-old stall which seems to provide a larger-than-life spark to an otherwise listless Wawasan Selera foodcourt in suburban Kelana Jaya. Last Sunday whilst I was there, I couldn’t help noticing a steady stream of mainly Malay-Muslim clientele, most of whom are regulars, going there for their Sunday morning breakfast. Oddly, although Lontong & Such, as its name suggests, specialises in lontong, the Javanese dish of compressed rice-cakes served with a lightly-spiced, cocout-rich vegetable curry (sayur lodeh), this stall’s bestseller happened to be its English Big Breakfast (?!). Yup, sausages, eggs, baked beans, mushrooms, tomatoes & toast - the woiks, but all of which are guaranteed halal, which was what its customers were looking for. And all for only an incredible MYR8 or £1.50.

But, as I am not about to come to a lontong stall in the middle of Kuala Lumpur for an English big breakfast, I stuck to having its lontong. :joy:

Lontong & Such’s stallowner and cook is the affable 50-year-old Azlan Aziz, a former London-based wedding planner-turned-cook. His wife, Nor Azizah aka Azie, studied in London and also helps in running the stall, although she wasn’t around during our visit last Sunday.

Azlan’s lontong was more-ish: we chose the Lontong Power option, which was something like a “lontong big breakfast”: it comes with all 3 side-dishes of spiced, fried paru (cow’s lung), turmeric-marinated and fried chicken breast, and sotong (fresh cuttlefish, cooked in a spicy, chili sambal sauce).
Azlan’s lontong is typical of Malaysia’s: its vegetable-tofu curry is more liquid than the thick, creamy Singapore-Malay version I’m more used to. But Azlan’s rendition is chockful of goodies: tempeh cubes, long beans, carrots, cabbage, glass noodles and tofu, garnished with half a hard-boiled egg, and sprinkled with serondeng kelapa (spiced, grated coconut).

We were also curious about its other offerings and ordered its __ Nasi Lemak Telur Goyang__ (MYR5) - very fragrant, pandan-scented nasi lemak, served with sambal, groundnuts, cucumber and topped with a sunny-side-up fried egg.

Another item on its menu is the Roti Jawa, a thick slice of toast topped with either kaya (sweet egg custard) or fried eggs topped with sauteed mushrooms, baked beans and cherry tomatoes (also only MYR5).

Overall, a delightful stall offering good quality food at very reasonable prices.

Address
Lontong & Such
Lot No. 21, Wawasan Selera
Jalan SS3/33, Petaling Jaya
Malaysia
Opening hours: 7.30am-2.30pm daily, except Fridays

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Nice. Except for the thought of the cow lung.

My brother in law’s mother used to include sheep/goat lung in her Frito Mallorquin (a fry up of potato, liver, onion and red pepper). It just wasnt at all pleasant - very chewy.

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:joy::joy::joy:
I was willing to try anything at least once. This one was, thankfully, quite good.

We were back to Lontong & Such last Sunday to try their “nasi ambeng”, a special rice dish of Javanese origins which the stall only offers on weekends.

Nasi ambeng usually consists of 4 parts: steamed rice, fried noodles, a meat dish (usually spiced chicken or beef) and a spicy salad called “urap”. Lontong & Such’s version had a turmeric-spiced fried chicken, and an “urap” of long beans, onion & wing beans in spicy grated coconut “kerisik” dressing.
I find the rendition here to be pretty chili-spicy - KL’s Malay food is very much influenced by Negeri Sembilan/Minang cooking and packed quite a bit more heat compared to Malay food from other regions of Malaysia.

We also ordered their lontong, which seemed to pale in comparison (in terms of the spice factor) to the rice dish, if one has had the much spicier nasi ambeng beforehand.

Still, KL’s lontong is blander and less rich (in terms of use of coconut milk) compared to the lontong one gets in Singapore, which I think is more aromatic and had more depth in flavour.

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