Is honey now trending?


(Kim) #1

I use honey occasionally; when there’s a sore throat in the house I use a bit more. This year I have received local organic honey and local organic honey and local organic honey (no, I did not accidentally cut and paste). I also received honey from New England and honey from Asheville. Did I mention the Colorado honey? How much honey can a household of two use?


(Andrea) #2

Apparently it is! At least it doesn’t go bad.

In the last few years, bee colony collapse has become an issue of concern, inspiring an increase in backyard bee-keeping.


(John) #3

Right now Manuka Honey from New Zealand is all the rage. According to our customers who ask for it it’s properties are little short of miraculous. We only sell local honeys so no Manuka at our place. We sell a lot of honey though. It might be our # 3 or 4? seller maybe. People buy it because they like it but also for allergies & general health benefits. That’s why we only carry the local stuff. There are four types harvested locally by our honey people. Wildflower, Blueberry, Cranberry & Pine Barren. I guess you can tell where we are by the types. Blueberry & Cranberry honeys are harvested from the hives placed in the Blueberry patches & Cranberry bogs to pollenate the crops.

FWIW & to answer the original question - yes it is trendy. We sold a LOT of gift paks & honeys that were destined to be gifts. Almost as many as hot sauce gift paks.


#4

How funny! Yes it is trendy, and with the widespread “sugar is evil” fear somehow honey is seen as “safe” and healthy -which it certainly is- so everyone ignores the fact it also actually IS a form of sugar. Whatever.
Lucky you!
I actually had a stranger at a coffee shop introduce me to adding a little honey as the sweetner for a shot of espresso and good lord that is freakishly delicious! Definitely try that with your goodies.


(John Hartley) #5

Don’t worry, fashion will soon fade. It was all the rage in the UK a year or so back.

I’m back to just buying local honey at the farmers’ market (except for a squeezy bottle of Rowse’s which I use for cooking when I can’t be bothered softening the local stuff in the microwave).


#6

I definitely see this trend. Paris has sponsored projects of creating bee hives on the rooftops. Problem: projects are failing and wasting tax payers money because there are not enough flowers in the neighbourhood to support of the new population.


#7

I have some questions concerning sugar, of course we knows the evils of it, I have even read somewhere that we could totally eliminate that from our diet, our consumption of vegetables and fruit has some sugar. Does sugar have any positive contribution to our body? I suspect that it makes us “happy”. This Christmas I observed how many people ask us to bring desserts when dining in their homes. How they fight for the cakes, the big smiles on their faces and that normally some of them are very health conscious and wouldn’t touch sweets.


(John Hartley) #8

If a food makes me happy, then I doubt I could wish for more.

As related matter, I reckon I’ve eaten more chocolate since last Friday than in the rest of the year all together.

But I have shown restraint over the festive period. Well, at least it was only this morning that I opened the tin of IKEA ginger thins biscuits. Delish.


#9

Didn’t know Ikea has a delish ginger thins, will try to grab a packet next time there.

If you don’t want extra sugar, you can try the very dark chocolat or even the 99% or 100%.

Back to honey, I myself seldom use it or for making desserts, only for cooking, like oriental cooking or some salad dressing. I saw honey from Paris - 140g for 17€, not sure I want that, with all the pollution problem here.


(Junior) #10

Honey is always trending in my home;

Honey take out the garbage.
Honey the toilet is clogged.
Honey the light over the sink needs to be changed.
Honey the dog puked.
Honey the garbage disposal isn’t working.
Honey…
Honey…

(for translation purposes I substituted Honey for a$$hole)


(j) #11

Honey is very popular lately . My daughter had the biggest jar of honey i ever saw on her Christmas dinner table ,She uses it in coffee and tea , yogurt with nuts , on pancakes and waffles . It was very pleasant and different . I know some local stores sell honey made in the local area and advertise it is good for allergies .Its ok to use even if crystalized . Since you seem well supplied now i would let your gifters know you are all stocked up.


#12

Yes it can. We received a gift of honey from a friend’s hives last year and it was delicious. When I opened it the other day for tea, the smell was definitely off.


(Kim) #13

Funny, I was going to remark that at least she still calls you honey :grin:


(Andrea) #14

Interesting! But it didn’t ferment or mold, just smells off?

Except for your friend’s honey, it is generally considered to have a very long shelf life :slight_smile:


#15

Since the 70’s .


#16

As long as you use a clean dry spoon and keep it covered, it shouldn’t spoil. Honey is naturally spoil resistant, but if any kind of bacteria gets introduced to it, that can cause spoilage.


#17

I see how Honey is such a magic word. I couldn’t get things done with mr naf. I asked basically the same things, response: let’s see tomorrow.