"intention-driven fare"

Saw a pop-up dinner touted as offering “intention-driven fare”.

What do you think that is supposed to mean? They really think about the menu a lot and have the best intentions for it to be good? Or is it a version of farm to table, sustainable, locally sourced, etc?

I’m pretty sure I’d rather have a flavor-driven meal!

2 Likes

‘We had the best intention. What comes out of the kitchen, however, it is what it is.’

5 Likes

No idea, but I’d bet my car it’s served in a “safe space”.

3 Likes

I need a trigger warning if there’s going to be mayo.

2 Likes

That if there’s a fly in your soup, it’s not a bug, it’s a feature.

5 Likes

Maybe they read too many books on phenomenology in college?

2 Likes

More than a few brain cells died trying to understand this statement,:dizzy_face:

2 Likes

Mine, too, and I actually majored in philosophy.

3 Likes

Pop-ups commonly have websites. Did you get the name of this one? Where is it?

1 Like

It’s not an ongoing thing, just one dinner, but here is their website full of more flowery prose. http://www.brotherscateringseattle.com/#about The “intention-driven fare” was part of a Facebook post promoting a dinner next month.

Full disclosure: I’ve worked in kitchens with these guys before and one brother kinda bugs me. So while I am mocking them a little with this thread it is also a serious question whether that’s a phrase in common use and how it relates to food because I’m not new-agey or particularly philosophical and haven’t heard it before. I still like to add a little twist to my food products but have gotten over trying to be obscure or weird about it. At this point my focus is to make really high quality, delicious product that has wide enough appeal that I can sell enough to pay my bills. I know these guys have skills, but they come off as too interested in how creative they think they are. But if they can build their business and find their niche, good for them.

2 Likes

That might be a bit of an understatement. Flowery, lurid, purple…ingredients are “product” and food is “executed” (that’s not a word I like seeing close to food topics - much like I wince at “cutting edge” on medical sites).

Really, I’d avoid them simply based on the prose. (Which might be doing myself a disservice, as their food might be marvelous, but I’m sure not driven to seek it out.)

3 Likes
“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold