Indian Regional Cuisines

Which are “southern type” in Jackson Heights? I’d love to have something closer than the Nassau border.

In Jackson heights, or in Floral Park, Queens right before the Nassau / city line?

@PHREDDY
You mentioned all the Himalayan restaurants in JH and said there were southern style ones too. I assume you meant in JH. That’s what I’m interested in. I know many of the restaurants in Floral Park and Bellrose.

I have eaten at Himilayan Yak and Lasa.
Dera is a Pakistani restaurant with large long somewhat communal tables, and fun to go with a bigger crowd.

Strange though how neighborhoods change, I grew up in Floral Park/Bellerose in the 50’& 60’s, and the restaurants on Hillside are really good.

Phreddy (and others) - I’m interested to know how much your Nepalese places differ from your “standard” Indian. In my experience in the UK, I’d say not very much - a few obviously Nepalese items on the menu (such as momo) together with what seem to be generic Anglicised North Indian dishes simply given a Nepalese name (see, for instance, the “Kathmandu chicken masala” on the menu of this local place - http://www.greatkathmandu.com/themenu/ )

@PHREDDY
None of those are south Indian in any way.

The Nepalese are mostly (all?) Tibetan (refugees who ended up in Nepal - and India - and then emigrated to the US).

They have dishes from the region (momos, thukpa, etc), plus north indian and indian chinese dishes. But, as with other regional places, they have to have enough things on the menu that customers want to eat.

ETA: the wiki entry is very interesting on sub-types of Nepali food.

Dosa Delight, Samudra, both in JH. The temple canteen in Flushing, or Dosa Hut just outside.

It’s more common to find vegetarian-only South Indian (commonly called “udipi” style in India) than meat-inclusive.

Correct they are not south Indian in any way.

Jackson diner, I have tried Dosa Delight once (ok)
Maharaja Sweets for Dosas.

Give Rajbhog (Gujarati, chaat), Dhaulagiri (momos, thukpa), and Kabab King (kababs, biryani) a try if you haven’t before.

Strangely, some of the frozen food available at Patel is now better than the local fresh options - a lot comes from Canada, some from Indian or Pakistani brands but manufactured there.

Maharaja is North Indian - good for chaat ingredients, but not always fresh (except at Diwali, when the sweets are freshly made and excellent).

Have been eating in the area since 2004, when I opened a laundromat on 37th Avenue. I have not been to Rajbhog in a long time, and as I remember is good…with so many choices, it is hard to get attached to one place.

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I never ate at Rajbhog while Dimple existed (still miss it). The son came back to modernize/expand and it improved a lot.

Something of a co-incidence that there’s been a new post today. In the last week or so, a new Indian restaurant has opened in the village and, this morning, I got chatting to the owner. He confirmed that the restaurant is one I knew from a different part of the metro area, which closed at the beginning of last year.

It was, and is, called the Punjab Tandoori but, in spite of that name, it has always had a menu strong on South Indian dishes. In fact, back in day when I started visiting the original place (well over 10 years back), it was the only place in the metro area where you could get a dosa. And, it was always very strong on vegetarian dishes which, perhaps, take on a lesser role to meat in Punjabi cuisine (in fact, my notes suggest we’ve only ever eaten vegetarian dishes here). Expect to see a dinner review on the UK board in the next couple of weeks or so.

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