How do you make Chili?


#41

Try this recipe :smile:


(Jimmy ) #42

Ouch!

Makes me think back to the time I brought in about three gallons of my Baked Potato Soup to a Christmas party at our build shop. Without telling me, one of the lunch coordinators decided to reheat the soup on a hot plate starting at 8 AM, when lunch was set up to start serving at 11AM. It took until sometime after 10 for someone to notice the smell, and come get me. A few brave souls sampled the resultant disaster; but I took nearly all of the sludge left in my very favorite stock pot out to the field behind the shop, and pried as much as I could out on the ground for the resident raccoons to feast on. Then flipped the ruined stock pot into one of our 10 yard haul aways.


#43

Double ouch!!


#44

Lunch coordinators, who are these clueless people.

Very Black Friday we had Freebirds Burritos, I took one bite and spit it out. Saturday it was cardboard pizza from Costco.

One Extremely Black Friday the person in charge chose Sam’s Club meatballs in a bad sauce. Fittingly the author of this madness got a rock in his meatball.

This gourmet fare comes from a company that does over one million dollars in sales that day.

Then there was the year of boiled hot dogs with canned chili and cheese.

Then there was the infamous Chick Fil A day and they were delicious but… overly officious corporal Kathy strictly restricted the morning crew to one each with penalty of death stare not to try and get another.

It turns out they ordered 4 million sandwiches for the evening bunch and they gorged themselves leaving 40-50 uneaten which naturally were left out of the refrigerator overnight.

Please.


(ChristinaM) #45

I was pretty happy with chili I made tonight based on a recipe I came up with in 2009. The basic gist: brown 1/2" cubes of well-marbled, seasoned stew meat (around 2 lbs. - think it was short rib) in batches, then brown 1 1/2 diced onions and a small can of tomato paste in the fond, deglaze with about 1/2 c. Zinfandel, and scrape up the brown bits with another 1 c. of broth (beef + vegetable Better than Bullion). Add the browned meat back in and crumble up one lb. of organic 97/3 ground beef into the pot. Then add one can each of Muir Glen fire-roasted and stewed diced tomatoes, several good heaping Tbsp. chili powder, a Tbsp. cumin, about 1/2 tsp. garlic granules, a good shake of Badia Adobo, and a couple tsp. cocoa powder.

Braised the meat covered for about 1 1/2 hrs at 330F, then stirred in two cans of drained light kidney beans and one can of seasoned pintos with liquid. Continued cooking another hour in the oven until the short rib was very tender. Served with corny cornbread, scallions, sour cream, sliced serranos, and shredded cheddar.


#46

That looks great! Nicely done and wonderful presentation!

I got a pint of dried tepin chilis today delivered from my Mexican friend, along with a bunch of other Mexican goods. Early christmas to me :slight_smile:

Holy cow, one of these little things will light you up! I ate one and was taken back. I am now trying to plan how to grind these and put them into my chili recipes. I never thought something so small could be so potent.


#47

I’ve never thought of putting chili in the oven.
How does that change the outcome?


#48

Does anyone have a 101 crash course on making green chili? I just need a base to work with. I will be able to season it up myself I think. I’ve made countless pots of red tomato based chili, but sadly never a single pot of green. I think I need to give this a shot :slight_smile:

I’ve got all types of cool stuff from Mexico as of last night flown into nj from my friend’s mom. As mentioned, I’ve got a pint of dried tepin. This will probably last me years. I’ve got another pint of pickled tepin, a jar of green jalapeño salsa that is awesome, another jar of some red salsa, a bunch of corn and flour tortillas, a container of cow meat (I think cheek,) several big cheese wheels, several hot sauces, dried beef, jerky, and other things. My fridge is loaded with local products from Sonora and I’m trying to think how to use this all. Last night I made tacos and quesadillas.

Check out these evil little guys…

I think they will really tune up a pot of green chili


#49

I have a neighbor who has a tepin chile bush growing by his mailbox. I asked him once if I could harvest a couple to put in something I was planning on cooking and he told me to help myself. He said he never used them but his Latino yard crew refused to cut down the bush so it just stayed there.

Apparently it was there when he bought the house.


#50

I had one dried one last night and it burned! They are super hot and red.

Then I had three pickled green ones later in the night…in a row. That was about all I could take without becoming uncomfortable. They are cool little peppers. Looks can be deceiving.

I looked online and it appears birds eat these. Do they just swallow them whole?


#51

Check these babies out. This is my first time trying these peppers. Some holiday cheer from Mexico…


#52

Roast tomatillos in their husks with a bit of water so they steam, and till charred, then use those as your base. Onions, garlic, and peppers to taste. Some cumin.
Then what I learned while living in Phoenix was to use a citrus component, your choice.
People would have big buckets of various lemons,
oranges, grapefruit, etc on the curb free for the taking.
I’ve always distinguished between Chili Verde and Green Chile Stew by the addition of potatoes and the omission of citrus :tangerine:
in the latter. That’s just the way I learned from the Mexican Mamas where my wife worked. You can add oregano and cilantro too. I prefer all tomatillos and no tomatoes :tomato:, but once again, my preference
only.
I’m waiting for a new batch of black pepper jerky, BTW. I didn’t forget you. :slight_smile:


#53

Too late to edit, but I realized I left out that GCS is made with peppers only as tomatillos are a 2000 ft elevation and below crop, at least as I understood it historically. Nowadays I think the 2 dishes have become more co-mingled.
And just for a bit of healthy, carrots :carrot: are a
tasty addition.


(ChristinaM) #54

Just more even heat, I think it cooks the meat more gently and prevents stringiness.


#55

That’s how birds eat pretty much everything small enough to fit down their throats (no teeth!) so, yeah. I’m not sure even all mammals react to capsaicin the way humans do (i.e., in pain), but at least to all appearances, bird don’t at all, and they’re a prime, er, distributor of the (indigestible) seeds. The bush near NotDoobieWah’s neighbor’s mailbox most likely resulted from a bird (ahem) “dropping by”…


#56

Yeah I read this and found it interesting. I guess they don’t affect birds that much. You should see what seagulls eat near me. It is amazing. They will literally choke down a chicken leg bone. After crabbing I will wing a bone out and they will just inhale it.

They will eat whole fish racks too. Anything they can fit down their throat they will demolish.


#57