"Stop Food Waste"

Are you on utility water? How do you feel about chlorine or chloramine and flouride in your water from the tap? Look up the evaporation rate of chlorine.

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My husband helped convince me to get a counter depth refrigerator inside ( with the workhorse refrigerator in the garage) bethis? Of things like compressors and things that are supposed to extend shelf life with filters like this

I have yet to add that part . Any thoughts about things like, this?

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We have little porous packets of ethylene absorbent in our crisper drawers.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000QA8Q0K

Not magic by they do extend shelf life. Something built into the fridge would be nice. I suspect you’ll still have some element that has to be replaced every 60 to 90 days.

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Are you talking about the same stuff packed with cameras to absorb moisture?
:slight_smile:

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Fixed that. The tag came with the Google search for the product.

I don’t think the product in the packet for absorbing ethylene is the same as the hydroscopic dessicant packets used for cameras, electronics, and tools. The latter I used to get in bulk from Harbor Freight, now they’re cheaper from Amazon if you watch the prices. I use CamelCamelCamel to automatically track prices and send me an alert when there is a good deal on dessicant, Triscuit Minis, kitty litter, and other First World critical items.

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30 hours, washed, spun, layered with damp paper towels in the spinner.



Definitely made it more likely it was on the menu tonight.

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Looks like a 72 hour keeper. grin

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9 days! Damp paper towel on top is dry, uppermost leaves limp, but several looking good enough to eat. But I havent eaten them, and got some more in. Y every two week csa box.

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I read somewhere to soak berries in acidulated water, then drain/dry and store - to slow spoilage.

The real issue I have is that organic berries have such a fleeting moment of ripeness before they start spoiling.

@shrinkrap have you tried refreshing limp greens in cold water? Have always read about it but I don’t eat enough lettuce to know if it works.

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Last year we had a special order of wild mushrooms - it arrived in a cardboard box, and they said to leave the mushrooms in there till use, and they would last a few weeks. I was skeptical, but even a few weeks down the last of them had dried up a bit but were still usable.

The packaged ones from the grocery store are done a disservice by the tight plastic wrap. When I buy them loose, they always seem to last longer.

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Same, but I put them back in the thin bag, loosely wrapped. They last a while longer for me that way.

Salsa verde, chutney, charmoula, or “pesto” (non-basil) are my attempt at reducing herb waste - when I am not being lazy.

There was a side discussion on storing herbs a while back.

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I do, and it does. Some types of lettuce more than others.

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I love it- I’m going to post this on the fridge door right after I pull the basil that my husband put in there yesterday out and put it in a jar of water

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I’ve had cut basil last 3 wks on my kitchen counter. After you put the stems in water, also put a plastic bag loosely around the whole bouquet. It creates a warmer/humid atmosphere that they like.

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Speaking of stop food waste, we had a somewhat small dinner yesterday and I thought I’d bulk it up with smoothies. We should have called these the no-one-wants-this-fruit-anymore smoothies :slight_smile: There were 3 languishing pluots in the crisper drawer that were wrinkled and soft. There were 2 tiny honeydew melons that I grew but that did not have ideal flavor. They had been in the fridge a week. Add to that a whole large nectarine whose texture was mealy. A little juice, a few froz blueberries (nothing wrong with those) and voila, saving the fruit. I’ve been known to use this trick before. And if I have sad looking veg, they usually go unnoticed when thrown into a veg soup, or sauteed and put into a meatloaf. I am a big proponent of stop the waste.

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“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold