It’s 2024 - What Are You Reading?

This is going to be epic.

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I’m reading Emperor’s Children – my second novel by Claire Messud. It’s pretty good - told from alternating viewpoints of about six or so interrelated characters. It “reminds” me a little bit of Normal People by Sally Rooney, which of course came out later in 2018. I first heard about Messud when reading reviews of The Goldfinch and learning that her husband had given that novel a bad review. The writer explaining the debate attributed this to his wife’s (Messud’s) recent novel, which, while receiving critical acclaim, was not a runaway bestseller like The Goldfinch. Messud is a good writer, and I like this book almost as much as her The Woman Upstairs, which is pretty devastating (in a good way). It’s way better than The Goldfinch. :joy:

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Finally got to the top of the list at my local library for James by Percival Everett. Picked it up yesterday afternoon and am excited to get reading. Meanwhile, I listened to a short novel called Sipsworth by Simon Booey after reading about it in WaPo book review section. Charming story about an elderly woman and a surprise pet. Also refreshing that it wasn’t a massive tome - I finished the 6 hour audio book last night.

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The Big Door Prize, now a series on Appletv.
Masters of the Air, the Appletv series was good the book is incredible.

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I have also read the book Masters of the Air. It’s excellent. These fliers were as brave as any members of the US armed forces.

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So right. The authors detail had me thinking on it for days.

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Still working my way through Madfur Jaffrey’s ‘An Invitation to Indian Cooking’ (got a pristine copy from Thrift Books) and The Ultimate History Cookbook magazine and Cook’s Illustrated magazine through overdrive.com and my state library.

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San Francisco used to have Overdrive; now they only offer Libby and Hoopla … I much preferred Overdrive.

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Can you say more? I’m trying to learn more about using Libby. So far I have only used it like “Audible”.

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Overdrive was Libby’s predecessor, same company. What I like about Libby is that is a single interface for multiple library accounts. Here in the DMV there is reciprocity between library systems so I can search 6 different systems in Libby with ease

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Why was my book recommendation here flagged as “spam?”

Isn’t this thread about recommending books we are reading?

It is THE comprehensive history of UFOs, as in nothing like it has been written before, and I thought it might be interesting to some.

Those who don’t care for the subject are certainly free not to order or read it, but FLAGGING a BOOK RECOMMENDATION IN A THREAD ABOUT BOOKS?

WTAF.

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If this book is written by someone you know, as I believe it is, that’s probably why your post was flagged - as it could be considered shilling. I’m not saying whoever flagged you made the right call, but I do understand the logic behind it.

Ah.

No doubt any & all past mentions of my CD or video recordings are next.

:dancer: :wink:

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Start the countdown!

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:rofl: :woman_shrugging: :laughing:

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(moved from the 2023 reading topic)

I’m most of the way through The Paris Novel by Ruth Reichl. I’m amused at how it’s become a detective novel. I’m also amused at how she’s added real-life characters and settings, with twists. The protagonist finds herself staying at Shakespeare and Company Books, where I lived for a month three years before the book’s setting. The owner, George Whitman, is drawn as much nicer than how I remember him, which was prickly and temperamental. Fictional George entered Paris with the American liberation army, but real George didn’t get there until a few years later. This George has a precocious seven year old daughter named Lucie, where the real George’s daughter Sylvie would have been three (Sylvie now owns and runs the bookshop). The word “tumbleweed” to describe the rotating cast of residents at the bookstore didn’t come into use until later. Reichl’s sensuous descriptions of vast numbers of French dishes gets a little repetitive, But that’s all ok, it’s still a charming book.

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You Like It Darker, Stephen King’s latest. A collection of short stories. So far so good.

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I finished James by Percival Everett. Highly recommend this one; a Goodreads 5 stars from me. I started a non-fiction audiobook, Nine Lives: Death and Life in New Orleans, and fiction hardcover The Thirty Names of Night, by Zeyn Joukhadar. Just started both last night so not much of an impression yet but were referred to me by readers I respect so high hopes!

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Thanks Rooster, I’ve enjoyed his shorter works going back to Nightshift.

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Ditto. The book review I read on this new collection of stories includes unfinished works going back as far as 45 years ago. Imagine King’s filing cabinet of unfinished work. :exploding_head:

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