Difference between Mediterranean and Middle Eastern food?

I prefer to use the term “seasoned” when I am not referring to spices that impart heat, e.g. I seasoned my >insert dish< with >insert seasonings/herbs/spices/etc.< vs. I made a spicy >insert dish<.

Seems like a clearer distinction, at least to me.

Lucky! I wish I met more NYC Hounds and HOs when I was able to visit more often! I did meet up with @Buttertart a dozen times, or so! I’d bring her Ontario Cheddar and Canadian candy, and she’d send me home with home baking.

I watched the original when I was a kid but nothing stuck. I haven’t seen the new one.

I’m well beyond middle-aged. And glad to still be alive.

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Well I was thinking “An Affair to Remember,” but I guess they’re both romantic?

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Great post! I always like to try “ethnic” cuisines when I travel out of the US. Chinese food in Ecuador is great. Pizza, though, takes some gettin’ used to. When in Mexico, I always picture the wet sandwiches of Oaxaca, or any other tortas. But, if you go to a sub shop in most parts of MX, you’ll get something that most of our sub places just can’t beat. Great bread with fresh ingredients, for cheap…

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I’ve also been trying the pizzas marketed for various immigrant , religious and/or culture communities in Canada lately.

Indian pizza, Iranian pizza, halal pizza , and kosher pizza are niche markets. Quite a few Turkish pide places sell both pizza and pide .

I have tried one halal and South Asian pizza chain called Red Swan, and will try an independent place that has a mostly Punjabi client base.

I’ve also had pizza from most of the kosher pizza spots in Toronto.

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I finished up the last of mine a while ago. I cured/dried a beef tenderloin instead of the more commonly called for eye round (and water buffalo being scarce in these parts).

I most carefully did not tell my wife what I paid for the meat i was experimenting on.

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