BEER - What did we drink (today/recently)?

Deftones Phantom Bride by Belching Beaver Brewery (Oceanside, CA) - IPA

Interesting mixture of light citrus with piney, dank hoppiness from the first sip. This IPA is closer to a classical west coast one but somehow a bit muted and without any particular flavor upfront or dominant but more a constant mix with some mild bitterness in the finish.

3 Likes

Lavender Radler by Old Caz Beer (Rohnert Park, CA) - Shandy/Radler

Radlers tend to be mixtures of pilsner and lemonade but here they used a hoppy sour which really nicely works together with the not overly sweet lavender lemonade which also has only subtle floral notes. Great radler, very refreshing.

2 Likes

Picking Fields by Dust Bowl Brewing Company (Turluck, CA) - Imperial Milkshake IPA

Milkshake IPA like this one have a nice creamy, milk-like consistency by the addition of lactose which gives it also some sweetness that works well with mango and the hoppiness. Well balanced with a good bitterness in the finish.

2 Likes

Juicy by Barrelhouse Brewing Company (Paso Robles) - IPA

Very juicy IPA with a burst of orange, apricot and some hints of mango. Followed by some spices and a medium bitter, dry finish. Good beer but could be better with some more dank, resin to balance out the first fruit “wave”.

2 Likes

Don’t think I’ve seen lavender as a flavouring ingredient in beer here. Pretty sure if some high profile brewery makes it and the fanboys love it then maybe they would start making it here, too.

This one is from Amsterdam. Even though I’m not a big fan of “west coast style” IPA I decided to to give this one a go. Has a handful of classic American hops it it but the end result is not really soapy tasting (a problem associated with my allergies and intolerances). I think it tastes more like an APA.

From Berkshire, England. Faint smokiness and berries, roasted coffee and chocolate.

Descriptions on their site:
Primal Cut is a high-concept beer inspired by our Head Brewers tasting of some blackcurrant purée we sampled. He thought it would be ideal for a BBQ sauce, so we built a recipe with some smoked malt and coffee (imagine a coffee-rubbed brisket), which is all complemented by the fruity ’sauce-esque’ high notes.

Next 2 are from the Icelandic capital. Both are pitch black, “peated”, alcoholic and chocolatey/coffee. The kind of beer you want savour slowly on a chilly day/night.

Lovely! 2017 Armagnac barrel aged!

2 Likes

How did you like it - the description sounds very promising with a potentially nice balance between the smokiness and fruitiness from the black currents

A Beer named Duck by Mast Landing Brewing Co. (Westbrook, ME) - Pale Ale

Lime, lemon flavor upfront which get immediately followed by some peach and papaya notes. Afterwards the beer shows some spices, pine and a lot of bitterness and finishes with dry, bitter flavors.

Book of Tropics by Laughing Monk Brewing (San Francisco, CA) - Sour - Fruited Berliner Weisse

Fruit-added sours tend to be either go for extremes (very sour with strong fruit flavors) or try to find a moderate balance. This sour definitely goes for the latter - not overly sour but also only moderate guava and passionfruit flavors with a dry finish. Easy to drink but also a bit unremarkable.

2 Likes

A glass of Harvey’s Elizabethan Ale. Tasted a little raisin-y with kind of a tannic taste as well. Would drink again.

From the brewer’s website:

2 Likes

Juiced ! Guava by Henhouse Brewing Company (Petaluma, CA) - Sour - Fruited Gose

Typical gose with a characteristic of lemony tartness with a slightly, but not overwhelming, salty finish. If it wouldn’t have been written on the can I wouldn’t have guessed it contained any guava juice. Hardly any fruitiness detectable and so it was very unbalanced and one-dimensional.

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Hovered Ridge by Ten Bends Beer (Hyde Park, VT) - DIPA

Strong tropical (passionfruit, mango) flavor with some citrus/orange sourness. Followed by some medium bitterness with a long finish. Nicely balanced DIPA and very drinkable.

1 Like
“Food is a pretty good prism through which to view humanity.”

― Jonathan Gold