2024 Food Garden

Some green caterpillars moved into my kale this week. I guess I’ll try Palmolive and cayenne first.

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That sounds like Cabbage White caterpillars. I’ve used Dipel soluble granules for most caterpillar issues. If kept cold and dry, the bacteria-based caterpillar killer lasts for years.

It takes a while to dissolve; so, mix it in a jar first, where it’s easier to stir. I use nylon stockings to strain materials going into a sprayer, so the sprayer nozzle doesn’t clog…

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Thank you! I will look into it.

This is what 400 pitted sour cherries look like, before they hit the jam pot.

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Visited a friend today who has a sour cherry tree, but finds them too sour. Her teenager picked me some, along with some leaves and twigs. Will find a use for them tomorrow.

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Wow! :astonished: What a score!

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Sweet Rainier cherries. It’s 90 degrees in the shade this morning, with a 10 day forecast for more of the same. We’re frantically picking everything which can’t stand up for long in this heat.

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Another sour cherry grab this morning. I have to leave town on business for a couple of days during a heat-wave, and am unsure as to what will be left when I get back. This morning we took everything we thought looked good.

I’ve been experimenting with holding sour cherries. When I pick, I drop the pitted fruits into a bath of cold water and citric acid (Fruit Fresh :tm:).

If I strain and freeze pretty much immediately, the cherries hold their color for at least a year in a good freezer (possible longer, but we’ve always consumed them within a year).

If I strain and chill in the fridge, the cherries start to brown within several hours, and at the 12-hour mark, no longer meet my standards. You might be able to jam them at that point, but I think your color would suffer.

If I DO NOT STRAIN, but chill them in the citric acid bath, they’ve stayed true to their color for at least 2 days. The flavor is a little less punchy, but still quite good considering how fleeting these babies are. My last sample batch ran out after two days (small sample). Today’s harvest has been labeled as to time and date, and put in the fridge. I’ll be checking it again in a few days, and every day after that for an indication of just how long these can be kept (and I’ll be baking with them in the mean time).

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Yukon Gold potatoes (two crates on the left) and Kennebecs (far right). :potato:

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Do you prefer one over the other? We love the K round here.

When available, I like the Kennebec’s for French fries, and for potato chips. They have such a nice, white color which carries through cooking.

The Yukons are a great all-purpose spud. In a pinch, I would use either for anything.

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I really like Bintjes. Sometimes they take longer to cook.

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First time in four years of gardening. So sad.

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Squirrels?

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:point_right: The results of my experiment are in. The citric-acid batch will buy one about 3 days longevity for pitted sour cherries (after which they start to turn brown regardless). Not a miracle worker, but better than nothing in my book, and good to know should I ever need to shelve a project mid-way.

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I don’t know but I doubt it.

Some of today’s tomatoes
Wild Fred


Beauty King

Mallee Rose

Mallee Rose

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It looks a lot like Tomato Hornworm damage. They’re really well camouflaged. Look for caterpillar droppings for clues as to where the larvae is hanging out.

Why Weeds Are Worth Reconsidering

We’re told we should get rid of them. But one person’s menace can be another person’s medicine.

https://www.nytimes.com/2024/07/09/magazine/weeds-gardening.html/

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